Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:28 EDT

Latest Soil liquefaction Stories

2011-11-01 21:16:50

Special issue of Seismological Research Letters Details of an earthquake that rocked the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand in February 2011 may transform the way scientists assess the potential threat of fault lines that run through urban centers. According to a series of new papers published today in Seismological Research Letters (SRL), scientists were surprised at the impact of the earthquake, which registered a relatively moderate magnitude 6.2. The in-depth review of...

e98b4c4ebe1089a444a0da54efe3842d1
2011-04-19 10:20:14

The massive subduction zone earthquake in Japan caused a significant level of soil "liquefaction" that has surprised researchers with its widespread severity, a new analysis shows. The findings also raise questions about whether existing building codes and engineering technologies are adequately accounting for this phenomenon in other vulnerable locations, which in the U.S. include Portland, Ore., parts of the Willamette Valley and other areas of Oregon, Washington and California. A...

1cc35992bee3c4a10bfd8c4802d4a2b01
2010-12-10 13:41:18

As the U.S. policy makers renew emphasis on the use of nuclear energy in their efforts to reduce the country's oil dependence, other factors come into play. One concern of paramount importance is the seismic hazard at the site where nuclear reactors are located. Russell A. Green, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Virginia Tech, spent five years as an earthquake engineer for the U.S. Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board in Washington, D.C., prior to becoming a...

2008-07-31 03:00:28

By Andy Franks LONG BEACH - Your description of Tuesday's earthquake might be different from your friend's across town, but for a good reason: Geologic surveys show that some parts of Long Beach are more sensitive to ground motion. A survey conducted by the California Department of Conservation shows that large ground areas of Long Beach - including Belmont Shore and Naples Island - are more susceptible to liquefaction, or the sudden transformation of loose soils from a solid to a liquid...