Quantcast
Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest Soil Stories

2012-11-20 22:51:03

Understanding warming requires long term studies that account for real-life complexity In the northern hardwood forest, climate change is poised to reduce the viability of the maple syrup industry, spread wildlife diseases and tree pests, and change timber resources. And, according to a new BioScience paper just released by twenty-one scientists, without long-term studies at the local scale–we will be ill-prepared to predict and manage these effects. Following an exhaustive review...

2012-11-14 12:57:19

A distinguished Australian scientist, the winner of an international soil science prize, has called for Australia to lead a renewed global effort to reverse the alarming degradation and contamination of the world´s food-producing soils. Professor Ravi Naidu, the Managing Director of Australia´s CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment is this year´s recipient of the International Soil Science Award, presented annually by the Soil Science Society of...

Modern Soil Science Unearths Mayan Agriculture Secrets
2012-11-12 14:27:21

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online An analysis of maize agriculture in the soils of Guatemala's Tikal National Park has revealed some ancient Maya secrets. Scientists wrote in Soil Science of America Journal that they uncovered evidence for major maize production in lowland areas, where erosion is less likely and agriculture was presumably more sustainable for the Maya people. The Maya civilization reached its peak between 250 and 900 A.D., and first emerged...

2012-11-12 11:08:59

A typical landscaped yard consists of lawn area and ornamental plants. If watered properly, homeowners can see the beauty, pocket some green and save some water, according to a Texas A&M University turfgrass professor. Supplemental watering of urban lawns and landscaped areas is required to keep the plants healthy through the typical long, hot and dry summers and falls in Texas, according to Dr. Richard White, Texas AgriLife Research turfgrass management scientist in College Station....

2012-11-12 11:06:46

Fertilizing one's lawn is considered a necessary practice, as is with most agricultural crops. But how many people know about fertilizing a commercial forest, and how that might affect the environment and their investment? Dr. Jason Vogel, assistant professor of forest ecosystem science within the Texas A&M University department of ecosystem science and management, is studying just how much difference fertilization can make to the productivity of the forest and carbon sequestration....

2012-11-06 11:12:50

Phosphorus (P) is both an essential nutrient in agricultural fields and a contributor to poor water quality in surface waters. To encourage improved P management in fields, the P Index was proposed as a risk assessment tool in 1992. After 20 years of use, modifications, and growing pains, does the P Index accurately assess the risk of P loss? A special section being published next month in the Journal of Environmental Quality addresses that question. The collection of papers grew out of a...

2012-11-01 10:22:33

Root bacterial communities change under drought, help plants adapt to lack of water When there is little water available for plants to grow, their roots form alliances with soil microbes that can promote plant growth even under water-limiting conditions, according to research published Oct. 31 by Daniele Daffonchio and colleagues from the University of Milan, Italy in the open access journal PLOS ONE. Symbiotic relationships between plants and soil microbial communities are critical to...

Defrosting Permafrost Could Add To Climate Woes
2012-10-30 09:14:35

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As global warming extends its balmy fingers further into the Arctic regions, defrosting permafrost could release up to 44 billion tons of nitrogen and 850 tons of carbon into the atmosphere, according to a new study from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The doubling of atmospheric carbon that would result from such an unprecedented thaw figures to impact ecosystems, the atmosphere, the Earth´s lakes and rivers, the researchers...

2012-10-26 12:27:04

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) research confirms that the time-tested practice of amending crop soils with manure also can help restore soils on damaged post-mining landscapes. Thousands of acres of land with little or no vegetation, once mined for lead and zinc, remain throughout an area of southwestern Missouri, southeastern Kansas, and northeastern Oklahoma. The mining activities also left behind a legacy of lead-contaminated acidic soils, toxic smelter sites, and large...

Salt Marshes Disappearing
2012-10-18 21:05:22

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online [ Watch the Video: Why Our Salt Marshes Are Falling Apart ] Salt marshes along the eastern coast of the United States have been disappearing over the past two decades and a group of American researchers led by Linda Deegan of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Mass. has shown that an influx of phosphorus- and nitrogen-based nutrients is partly to blame. These nutrients come from untreated sewage systems and...


Latest Soil Reference Libraries

Sheet Mulching
2013-08-05 12:36:35

Sheet mulching, or lasagna gardening, is the process of turning barren ground into a more nourishing garden without digging. It is a layered system that can be used for a yard garden or a topical box garden. Starting at the bottom is a weed proof barrier, like newspaper or cardboard. On top of that is a twelve-inch layer of compost or mulch material such as old clothes, yard clippings, and manure, which provides for nutrient rich soil. Weed-free soil is added prior to planting the desired...

Desertification
2013-04-02 09:46:56

Desertification is a form of land degradation in which a comparatively dry land area becomes more and more arid, normally losing its bodies of water along with its wildlife and vegetation. This is a result of a variety of factors, such as climate change and human activities. Desertification is an important global, ecological, and environmental issue. There is substantial controversy over the proper definition of the term “desertification”. The most broadly accepted of these is that of...

Land Degradation
2013-04-02 09:20:15

Land degradation is a process in which the value of the biophysical environment is affected by one or more combination of human-induced processes acting on the land. It is also the gradual destruction or reduction of the quality and quantity of human activities, animal activities or natural means. It is viewed as any change or disturbance to the land perceived to be deleterious or unwanted. Natural hazards are not included in the causes; however, human activities can indirectly affect...

Erosion
2013-04-01 12:48:39

Erosion is the process by which rock and soil are taken from the surface of the Earth by exogenetic processes like wind or the flow of water, and then transported and deposited in another location. While erosion is a natural process, human activities have increased by 10 to 40 times the rate at which erosion is happening globally. Excessive erosion results in problems such as desertification, decreases in agricultural productivity because of land degradation, sedimentation of waterways,...

Soil Salinity
2013-04-01 11:15:13

Soil salinity is the salt content within the soil; the process of increasing the content of salt is known as salination. Salt is a natural element of water and soils. Salination can be a result of natural processes such as the gradual withdrawal of an ocean or mineral weathering. It can be caused by artificial processes such as irrigation as well. Soils that are affected by salt are a result of excess accumulation of salts, normally most obvious at the surface of the soil. Salts can be...

More Articles (11 articles) »