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Latest Solanum Stories

New Plant Species Discovered In The Heart Of Texas
2014-07-10 03:45:12

University of Utah Wrongly ID’d since ’74, Only Three Specimens Known Collectors found the first two specimens of the prickly plant in 1974 and 1990 in west Texas. Then, for two decades, the 14-inch-tall plant was identified wrongly as one species, then another and then a third. Now – after a long search turned up a "pathetic, wilted" third specimen – a University of Utah botanist and her colleagues identified the spiny plant as a new, possibly endangered species and named...

2014-06-24 09:37:19

Princeton University While African wildlife often run afoul of ranchers and pastoralists securing food and water resources for their animals, the interests of fauna and farmer might finally be unified by the "Sodom apple," a toxic invasive plant that has overrun vast swaths of East African savanna and pastureland. Should the ominous reference to the smitten biblical city be unclear, the Sodom apple, or Solanum campylacanthum, is a wicked plant. Not a true apple, this relative of the...

Unlikely Collaboration Leads To Discovery Of Gender-bending Plant
2013-12-03 16:25:42

Pensoft Publishers Bucknell professor Chris Martine never expected to be working with his mentor on identifying a new wild eggplant in Australia, especially since Martine's former colleague passed away years ago Bucknell University biology professor Chris Martine has discovered and described a new species of wild eggplant, found in Australia's Lost City. Martine, who named the plant Solanum cowiei, recently detailed his findings in the journal PhytoKeys. Martine described the plant...

A Review Of The Wild Relatives Of Some Favorite Food Plants
2013-05-14 12:04:42

Pensoft Publishers A new extensive study offers a complete revision and a new species from the vining Solanum species (the Dulcamaroid clade) The Solanaceae, also called the potato or nightshade family, includes a wide range of flowering plants, some of which are important agricultural crops. Tomatoes, potatoes, aubergines, peppers and wolfberries are all representatives of the family present on many tables across the world. Solanum is the largest genus of the family, and with 1500...

2010-11-24 11:25:00

The search is on for insects, mites, microbes or nematodes that could be used in a biologically based approach to controlling silverleaf nightshade, an invasive weed from the Americas that has spread to southern Europe, Africa, India, Australia and elsewhere. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist Walker Jones, the perennial weed, Solanum elaeagnifolium, is being targeted for its ability to outcompete native plants, reduce crop yields and diminish pasture...

2010-06-02 20:37:57

A recent study conducted by scientists with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and cooperators shows the potato germplasm Neo-Tuberosum, used by potato breeders to develop new cultivars, has origins that can be traced to Chile, not to the Andes as previously believed. Native "landrace" potatoes come from two areas: lowland central Chile and the Andes mountains from Venezuela south to northern Argentina. These geographical groups of potato, Solanum tuberosum, differ mainly in day-length...

2010-05-06 09:30:03

Four new Neotropical plant species in the hyperdiverse genus Solanum (Solanaceae), which includes plants as diverse as the deadly nightshade as well as the more palatable tomato have been published in the open access online-only journal PLoS ONE by Dr. Sandra Knapp of the Natural History Museum, London. Although several thousand new plant species are described each year, this paper represents a botanical pioneer: it is the first to be published in an online-only journal whilst adhering to the...

2008-06-13 21:00:03

By Kelly Young, Jacksonville Daily Progress, Texas Jun. 13--As we take time out of our busy lives to pay homage to the tomato and the impact it has had on the Jacksonville area, it is useful to have an understanding of the history of the tomato. It is a common misconception that tomatoes originated along the coastal lands of Mediterranean Sea, and while those areas are prime tomato-growing locations, the tomato was actually originally from much closer to home. History indicates that...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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