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Latest Solar variation Stories

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2006-08-17 08:00:00

On July 31st, a tiny sunspot was born. It popped up from the sun's interior, floated around a bit, and vanished again in a few hours. On the sun this sort of thing happens all the time and, ordinarily, it wouldn't be worth mentioning. But this sunspot was special: It was backward. "We've been waiting for this," says David Hathaway, a solar physicist at the Marshall Space Flight in Huntsville, Alabama. "A backward sunspot is a sign that the next solar cycle is beginning." "Backward" means...

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2006-03-14 12:33:19

Stanford -- The hidden face of the sun is fully visible for the first time, thanks to a new technique developed at Stanford University. Only half of the sun--the near side--is directly observable. The far side always faces away from Earth and is therefore out of view. But the new technology allows anyone with a computer to download images of the entire solar surface--an important advance with practical applications, say researchers, because potentially damaging solar storms that form on the...

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2006-03-12 10:30:00

NASA -- It's official: Solar minimum has arrived. Sunspots have all but vanished. Solar flares are nonexistent. The sun is utterly quiet. Like the quiet before a storm. This week researchers announced that a storm is coming -- the most intense solar maximum in fifty years. The prediction comes from a team led by Mausumi Dikpati of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). "The next sunspot cycle will be 30% to 50% stronger than the previous one," she says. If correct, the years...

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2006-03-06 15:45:00

By Deborah Zabarenko WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Sun-spawned cosmic storms that can play havoc with earthly power grids and orbiting satellites could be 50 percent stronger in the next 11-year solar cycle than in the last one, scientists said on Monday. Using a new model that takes into account what happens under the sun's surface and data about previous solar cycles, astronomers offered a long-range forecast for solar activity that could start as soon as this year or as late as 2008. They offered...

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2006-03-06 11:30:00

NSF -- The next sunspot cycle will be 30 to 50 percent stronger than the last one, and begin as much as a year late, according to a breakthrough forecast using a computer model of solar dynamics developed by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colo. The research results, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and NASA, were published on-line on March 3 in the American Geophysical Union journal Geophysical Research Letters. Scientists now...

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2005-10-10 06:00:00

Solar activity can be surprisingly good for astronauts. NASA -- Last month, the sun went haywire. Almost every day for two weeks in early September, solar flares issued from a giant sunspot named "active region 798/808." X-rays ionized Earth's upper atmosphere. Solar protons peppered the Moon. It was not a good time to be in space. Or was it? During the storms, something strange happened onboard the International Space Station (ISS): radiation levels dropped. "The crew of the ISS absorbed...

a8262580b11354bc1e5a588538bf6c171
2005-09-30 17:10:00

DURHAM, N.C. -- At least 10 to 30 percent of global warming measured during the past two decades may be due to increased solar output rather than factors such as increased heat-absorbing carbon dioxide gas released by various human activities, two Duke University physicists report. The physicists said that their findings indicate that climate models of global warming need to be corrected for the effects of changes in solar activity. However, they emphasized that their findings do not argue...

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2005-09-16 07:25:00

NASA -- Just one week ago, on Sept. 7th, a huge sunspot rounded the sun's eastern limb. As soon as it appeared, it exploded, producing one of the brightest x-ray solar flares of the Space Age. In the days that followed, the growing spot exploded eight more times. Each powerful "X-flare" caused a shortwave radio blackout on Earth and pumped new energy into a radiation storm around our planet. The blasts hurled magnetic clouds toward Earth, and when they hit, on Sept 10th and 11th, ruby-red...

e5d9d1bc1d861c335ed7dcefc976fe161
2005-05-06 07:00:00

With solar minimum near, the sun continues to be surprisingly active. Science@NASA -- There's a myth about the sun. Teachers teach it. Astronomers repeat it. NASA mission planners are mindful of it. Every 11 years solar activity surges. Sunspots pepper the sun; they explode; massive clouds of gas known as "CMEs" hurtle through the solar system. Earth gets hit with X-rays and protons and knots of magnetism. This is called solar maximum. There's nothing mythical about "Solar Max." During the...

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2005-04-14 00:05:00

Bonn study shows: Since 1880 climate gases have caused just under half of global warming Bonn -- In the last 120 years the average global temperature has risen by 0.7 degrees. Over the same period the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere increased from 0.28 to 0.37 per cent. Carbon dioxide is one of the so-called 'greenhouse gases'; methane, which is produced as part of the process of cattle-rearing, for example, is also a greenhouse gas. Its concentration in the atmosphere has...


Latest Solar variation Reference Libraries

How Solar Cycles Impact Our Weather Here On Earth
2013-01-13 09:10:34

Solar cycles: what are they and why should we care about them? Solar cycles are made up of what are known as solar minimums (min) and solar maximums (max). We refer to a solar min at the time when the sun is not active with many sunspots, while a solar max is just the opposite when we see a large increase in sunspot activity. So how long do solar cycles last? Typically they run on what is known as an 11 year cycle from the max to the min and then start over again anew. As of 2012 we...

Incoming Solar Radiation Impacts By Various Weather Cycles
2012-08-22 13:30:39

The above image looks at the month of March for the three cycles known as Normal Phase, El-Nino, and La-Nina. The data was recorded for the city of Honolulu Hawaii, during the month of March. Remember this is just data for one month during these cycles. Normal: During this cycle incoming solar activity was upwards to 48% efficient for the month, producing less than 50% of the month which is due to the large amount of daily cloud cover that is seen on the island during the early morning and...

Weather Reference Library
2012-07-23 13:36:11

Being a meteorologist for over thirteen years you start to take note of many things in the atmosphere and how they repeat themselves. Our Climate is no different. The definition of climate is stated as: the collective weather data in regards to moisture and temperature for over 30 years for the same location. So to better understand our climate we need to look at this. First, we have average temperatures for given places based on the 30 year average. Some years the temps are warmer or...

Incoming Solar Radiation Impacts By Various Weather Cycles
2012-07-23 11:19:47

The above image looks at the month of March for the three cycles known as Normal Phase, El-Nino, and La-Nina. The data was recorded for the city of Austin Texas. Remember this is just data for one month during these cycles. Normal: During this cycle incoming solar activity was upwards to 60% efficient for the month, producing enough solar energy that only 40% of the month would have not had strong incoming radiation. EL-Nino: This phase provided the area with an extended number of...

0_f3f67f1a9c604fdd3e936cc46b6a745b
2009-03-03 21:08:51

Charles Greeley Abbot (May 31, 1872 "“ December 17, 1973) was an American astrophysicist and astronomer born in Wilton, New Hampshire. He graduated from Phillips Academy in 1891 and MIT in 1894, with a degree in chemical physics. In 1895 Abbot was hired by Samuel Pierpont Langley as an assistant at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) despite his lack of experience in astronomy. Hired originally for his laboratory skills, Abbot became acting director of the SAO in 1896. When...

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Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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