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Chiton Teeth Inspire Solar Cell, Lithium-ion Improvements
2013-01-17 05:50:53

[ Watch the Video: Using Snail Teeth to Improve Solar Cells and Batteries ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study led by the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering is using the teeth of a coastal California marine snail to create less costly and more efficient nanoscale materials in an effort to improve solar cells and lithium-ion batteries. Published in the recent issue of Advanced Functional Materials, assistant professor of...

Ulstrastable Glass Gets Its Properties From Tetris-Like Structure
2013-01-07 13:27:01

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Like a fine wine or aged cheese, ultrastable glass takes a long time to make, needs special conditions and is considered quite valuable. Unfortunately, manufacturers who want to take advantage of the strengths of ultrastable glass don´t have the luxury of waiting hundreds of years for it to develop. While exploring ways to create this valuable material on a shorter timetable, researchers from the University of Wisconson-Madison...

Real-Time CT-Scan Test Rig For Ceramic Composites At Ultrahigh Temperatures Developed
2012-12-10 16:41:08

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next generation gas turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge — until now. Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)´s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed the first testing facility...

Liquid Metals Have Different Breaking Points
2012-11-26 08:55:23

DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Mathematical methods developed by a Berkeley Lab researcher help explain why liquid metals have wildly different breaking points, depending on how they are made Metallic glass alloys (or liquid metals) are three times stronger than the best industrial steel, but can be molded into complex shapes with the same ease as plastic. These materials are highly resistant to scratching, denting, shattering and corrosion. So far, they have been used in a...

2012-10-24 12:05:33

For the first time, scientists have observed how droplets within solids deform and burst under high electric voltages. This is important, the Duke University engineers who made the observations said, because it explains a major reason why such materials as insulation for electrical power lines eventually fail and cause blackouts. This observation not only helps scientists develop better insulation materials, but could also lead to such positive developments as "tunable" lenses for eyes....

Ordered Atoms Found In Glass Materials
2012-10-02 15:10:29

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy´s (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered the underlying order in metallic glasses, which may hold the key to the ability to create new high-tech alloys with specific properties. Glass materials may have a far less randomly arranged structure than formerly thought. Over the years, the ideas of how metallic glasses form have been evolving, from just a random packing, to very small ordered clusters, to realizing that longer range chemical and...

Thinner Aerogel Is 500 Times Stronger
2012-08-20 08:16:23

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An enhanced version of the world's lightest solid material, said to be as much as 500 times stronger than its predecessors, was unveiled during a meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) on Sunday. The substance, a new flexible aerogel, replaces traditional silica-based types of the solid insulating material, the organization said in an August 19 announcement. Traditional aerogels are brittle, easy to break, and prone to...


Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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