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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 17:20 EDT

Latest Somatic cell nuclear transfer Stories

2009-03-25 08:23:02

San Antonio and Honolulu researchers make important discoveries about point mutation rates in cloned mouse fetusesSan Antonio "¦ Germ cells, the cells which give rise to a mammal's sperm or eggs, exhibit a five to ten-fold lower rate of spontaneous point mutations than adult somatic cells, which give rise to the body's remaining cell types, tissues and organs. Despite their comparatively higher mutation rates, however, adult somatic cells are used as the donor cells in a cloning...

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2009-02-03 07:35:00

According to a report appearing in the journal Cloning and Stem Cells, animal eggs cannot be used to create human clones.Dr. Robert Lanza of Advanced Cell Technology and his colleagues failed in an effort to use mouse, cow, and rabbit eggs to produce workable human embryos.Lanza reported that his team was able to make a viable embryo using human cells, and believes that human cloning appears to be possible in principle.Researchers in the past have tried using animal eggs as a source for...

2009-02-02 12:30:00

NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y., Feb. 2 /PRNewswire/ -- Since the cloning of Dolly the Sheep over a decade ago, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been considered a promising way to generate human, patient-specific stem cells for therapeutic applications. The shortage of human donor eggs has led to efforts to substitute animal oocytes. However, a new study published online ahead of print in the Volume 11, Number 2, 2009 issue of Cloning and Stem Cells, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann...

2009-02-02 13:40:00

Since the cloning of Dolly the Sheep over a decade ago, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been considered a promising way to generate human, patient-specific stem cells for therapeutic applications. The shortage of human donor eggs has led to efforts to substitute animal oocytes. However, a new study published online ahead of print in the Volume 11, Number 2, 2009 issue of Cloning and Stem Cells, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., demonstrates that animal...

2009-02-02 12:00:00

New study questions ability of human-animal hybrids to generate stem cells WORCESTER, Mass., Feb. 2 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. (OTC Pink Sheets: ACTC) and its collaborators reported today that human oocytes (or 'eggs') have the capacity to extensively reprogram adult human cells. The research, which appears online ahead of print in the journal Cloning and Stem Cells (Editor-in-Chief: Sir Ian Wilmut; published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.) demonstrates that...

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2009-01-29 11:15:00

A South Korean biotech firm said on Thursday it has developed a new cloning technology that is expected to make cloning pet dogs easier and significantly cheaper. RNL Bio introduced the new method to clone dogs using stem cells derived from fat tissue that greatly increases the likelihood of a successful clone. Pet owners have been paying upwards of $100,000 to clone a pet dog, but RNL Bio says the newly efficient technique could drop costs as much as 50 percent. However, those interested in...

2008-11-24 10:29:24

Stem cell scientists in California say they're having trouble finding enough human eggs to conduct their research. California's Proposition 71, designed to fund $3 billions in stem cell research, prohibits paying women to be egg donors, the San Diego Union-Tribune said Monday. The human eggs, however, are needed in order to conduct the research. The people of California passed Proposition 71 to fund billions of dollars worth of stem cell research including (therapeutic cloning) and then the...

2008-10-11 21:00:26

By Sandy Kleffman Four years after California residents captured worldwide attention by voting to spend $3 billion on stem cell research, many of the anticipated new therapies are at least 10 years away and numerous hurdles must be overcome. Yet the optimism remains. As research kicks into high gear, scientists point to areas that hold great promise, including: -- Using stem cells to deliver missing enzymes or absorb toxins to help keep dying cells alive. This approach may be useful...

2008-10-10 15:00:06

By MARK JOHNSON Japanese scientists have demonstrated a new way to reprogram cells without viruses, an important advance toward the goal of one day turning our own cells into a powerful tool to fight a wide range of diseases. The new technique, reported Thursday in the journal Science, appears to be both safer and simpler than previous methods, bypassing the cancer risk associated with using viruses and genes that remain inside a cell. The Japanese team, led by Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto...

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2008-09-17 15:50:00

The Australian government's National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) said Wednesday it has granted its first license allowing scientists to create cloned human embryos to obtain embryonic stem cells. The license was issued to the in vitro-fertilization firm Sydney IVF, which reportedly has access to 7,200 human eggs for its research.  If the company is successful in its endeavor, it would be the first in the world, according to NHMRC.  Although scientists in other...