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Latest Somatosensory system Stories

2011-05-27 12:42:56

A new research study conducted by University of Miami Frost School of Music's Music Engineering Technology Group touches upon multi-touch surfaces as emerging valuable tools for collaboration, display, interaction, and musical expression. The study will be presented at the 2011 International Conference on New Instruments for Musical Expression in Oslo, Norway this month. A Low-Cost, Low-Latency Multi-Touch Table with Haptic Feedback for Musical Applications, authored by Matthew Montag GMuE...

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2011-05-20 11:05:00

"Perhaps when we get hurt, we should not only "Ëœrub it better' but also cross our arms," said Dr. Giandomenico Iannetti, the lead author of a study at the University College London. The study, published in the journal PAIN, details how scientists used a laser to generate a four millisecond pin prick of "pure pain" "“ which is pain without touch "“ on the hands of a small group of eight participants, which was repeated with the arms crossed over the midline "“ an...

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2010-11-30 10:25:54

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers have captured pictures of the brain while patients experienced a pain stimulus with and without acupuncture to determine acupuncture's effect on how the brain processes pain. Results of the study, which the researchers say suggest the effectiveness of acupuncture, were presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). "Until now, the role of acupuncture in the perception and processing of...

2010-11-29 23:01:00

CHICAGO, Nov. 30, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), researchers have captured pictures of the brain while patients experienced a pain stimulus with and without acupuncture to determine acupuncture's effect on how the brain processes pain. Results of the study, which the researchers say suggest the effectiveness of acupuncture, were presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). "Until now, the role of...

2010-11-22 19:02:47

You detect an object flying at your head. What do you do? You probably first move out of the way -- and then you try to determine what the object is. Your brain is able to quickly switch from detecting an object moving in your direction to determining what the object is through a phenomenon called adaptation. A new study in the Nov. 21 advance online edition of the journal Nature Neuroscience details the biological basis of this ability for rapid adaptation: neurons located at the beginning...

2010-10-19 17:16:58

A new way of seeing the world Scientists at The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital "“ The Neuro, McGill University have discovered that our brains have the ability to determine the shape of an object simply by processing specially-coded sounds, without any visual or tactile input. Not only does this new research tell us about the plasticity of the brain and how it perceives the world around us, it also provides important new possibilities for aiding those who are blind or with...

2010-10-07 13:29:05

Finding explains why the blind can hear and feel with greater acuity than the sighted can People who have been blind from birth make use of the visual parts of their brain to refine their sensation of sound and touch, according to an international team of researchers led by neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC). Published today in the journal Neuron, the scientists say this finding helps explain why the blind have such advanced perception of these senses "“...

2010-07-15 16:16:56

Scientists have discovered the part of the brain that tracks the position of our limbs as we move through space. When a mosquito lands on your hand, you can rapidly and effortlessly make a movement of the other hand to brush it away, even in darkness. But performing this seemingly simple action involves a surprisingly complex coordination of different types of sensory information in order for your brain to construct a constantly updated 'map' of the body in space. Now, scientists from UCL...

2010-02-11 16:42:07

Scientists find sensory cortex develops late in fragile X syndrome defect Why do people with fragile X syndrome, a genetic defect that is the best-known cause of autism and inherited mental retardation, recoil from hugs and physical touch "“ even from their parents? New research has found in fragile X syndrome there is delayed development of the sensory cortex, the part of the brain that responds to touch, according to a study from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine....

2010-02-11 11:31:05

New research provides insight into why fragile X syndrome, the most common known cause of autism and mental retardation, is associated with an extreme hypersensitivity to sounds, touch, smells, and visual stimuli that causes sensory overload and results in social withdrawal, hyperarousal, and anxiety. The study, published by Cell Press in the February 11 issue of the journal Neuron, uncovers a previously unknown developmental delay in a critical brain circuit that processes sensory...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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