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Latest Somniosidae Stories

cf32d7177709b30cb80dd36186ba3d861
2009-07-20 12:29:44

A surprising and odd source is being tapped in order to provide biofuel for Inuits. The Greenland shark is one of the largest species of sharks. Its meat is considered toxic to humans and it is a complete nuisance to fisherman. Now, researchers hope they have found a new use for the grand creature. The Greenland shark is native to the frigid Arctic waters, and thousands of them get caught and die in fishermen's nets off Greenland every year and are thrown back into the sea. The animals are...

ce72d3d39d278a113a77b98b6de4b9651
2008-08-11 11:40:00

Known as top predator in its icy terrain around the North Pole, the polar bear could be at risk of becoming prey to another predator: the shark. Scientists at the Norwegian Polar Institute were trying to gauge the effect of massive thawing at the North Pole on how far sharks hunt seals in the Arctic. In June they made an unexpected discovery when they found part of the jaw of a young polar bear in the stomach of a Greenland shark. "We've never heard of this before. We don't know how it got...


Latest Somniosidae Reference Libraries

39_9f7bfef804b56251f95aff529920b779
2007-04-19 05:12:06

The Knifetooth dogfish, Scymnodon ringens, is a harmless sleeper shark of the family Dalatiidae, found in the eastern Atlantic, from Scotland to Spain, Portugal, and Senegal, and the southwest Pacific from New Zealand, between latitudes 58° N and 15° N, at depths of between (200 and 1,600 m). Its length is up to 3.61 ft (1.1 m). The Knifetooth dogfish is a rare species inhabiting continental slopes, usually mesopelagic although taken most often near the bottom. It is black in color,...

39_2a0ee7b7cef42b5b91a11e6fcbdbdebd
2007-04-19 05:08:06

The Sherwood dogfish, Scymnodalatias sherwoodi, is a very rare sleeper shark of the family Dalatiidae, found only around New Zealand. The only specimen studied was about 31.5 in (80 cm) long. The Sherwood dogfish has two dorsal fins of approximately equal size and shape, with no spine in either, and set well back towards the tail. In general appearance it is similar to the Greenland shark. The snout is somewhat flattened but not bulbous; the lower teeth have very high, erect or semi-erect...

0_9aca52ce604ab6cbe353829e5f93e404
2007-04-19 04:57:56

The Plunket shark, Centroscymnus plunketi, is a sleeper shark of the family Dalatiidae, found around south eastern Australia, and New Zealand, at depths of between 721.79 and 5085.3 ft (220 and 1,550 m) over continental shelves. It reaches a length of 51.18 in (130 cm). The Plunket shark has two dorsal fins of approximately equal size and shape, with a small spine in front of each. It has a very short snout, lanceolate upper teeth and bladelike lower teeth with short, oblique cusps, and a...

39_902a9587b07210b3c13805d610b9692a
2007-04-19 04:52:09

The Roughskin dogfish, Centroscymnus owstoni, is a sleeper shark of the family Dalatiidae, found circumglobally on continental shelves in tropical, subtropical and temperate seas, at depths of between 328.08 and 4921.26 ft (100 and 1,500 m). It reaches a length of 3.94 ft (120 cm). The Roughskin dogfish has two dorsal fins of approximately equal size and shape with a small spine in front of each, and a long pointed snout. The teeth are one of the main ways of distinguishing this species...

39_b5862bd3934249dff695290fa314d641
2007-04-19 04:40:05

The Longnose velvet dogfish, Centroscymnus crepidater, is a sleeper shark of the family Dalatiidae, found circumglobally in southern hemisphere subtropical seas, at depths of between 754.59 and 4921.26 ft (230 and 1,500 m). It reaches a length of 51.18 in (130 cm). The Longnose velvet dogfish has two dorsal fins of approximately equal size and shape, with a small spine in front of each. It has a long pointed snout, lanceolate upper teeth and triangular lower teeth with straight (not...

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Word of the Day
virgule
  • A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
  • A little rod; a twig.
This word comes from the Late Latin 'virgula,' accentual mark, a diminutive of 'virga,' rod.
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