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Latest Sonar Stories

2012-01-03 22:05:58

New research reveals a right-hemispheric bias in bats when it comes to tackling navigation and a left-hemispheric advantage for communication Imagine listening to music while carrying on a conversation with friends. This type of multi-tasking is fairly easy to do, right? That's because our brains efficiently and effectively separate the auditory signals — music to the right side; conversation to the left. But what researchers have not been able to do in humans or animals is to see a...

2011-11-28 15:15:07

By placing real and virtual objects in the flight paths of bats, scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Munich have shed new light on how echolocation works. Their research is published today in Behavioral Processes. The researchers found that it is not the intensity of the echoes that tells the bats the size of an object but the 'sonar aperture', that is the spread of angles from which echoes impinge on their ears. Echolocating bats emit calls for orientation. These calls bounce...

Bats, Dolphins, And Mole Rats Provide Ultrasound Inspriation
2011-11-15 04:10:40

TAU researchers look to animal "return signals" to shape medical and military advances Sonar and ultrasound, which use sound as a navigational device and to paint accurate pictures of an environment, are the basis of countless technologies, including medical ultrasound machines and submarine navigation systems. But when it comes to more accurate sonar and ultrasound, animals' "biosonar" capabilities still have the human race beat. But not for long. In a new project that studies bats,...

2011-10-25 19:00:00

Caroline DeLong, an assistant professor of psychology at Rochester Institute of Technology, is researching object discrimination in goldfish and echolocation in dolphins to bring scientists closer to unlocking the mysteries of animal perception and cognition. (PRWEB) October 25, 2011 The fictitious storybook character Dr. Doolittle was known for talking with animals. Caroline DeLong, an assistant professor of psychology at Rochester Institute of Technology, is a real-life Doolittle whose...

Image 1 - Multibeam Sonar Can Map Undersea Gas Seeps
2011-10-07 03:41:44

A technology commonly used to map the bottom of the deep ocean can also detect gas seeps in the water column with remarkably high fidelity, according to scientists from the University of New Hampshire and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This finding, made onboard the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer in the Gulf of Mexico, will lead to more effective mapping of these gas seeps and, ultimately, enhanced understanding of our ocean environments. The mapping technology,...

Bats Have Fastest Known Mammal Muscle
2011-09-30 05:04:01

Bats derive their ability to use echolocation, the bouncing of sound waves off objects to produce an accurate representation of the environment in total darkness, from so-called “superfast” muscles, researchers reported in latest issue of the journal Science. These superfast muscles, which are located in the bats´ larynx, are a physical trait never before seen in mammals, and allow the bate to make a rapid series of calls as they home in on their prey.   They...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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