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Latest Sonar Stories

Moths Use Hearing Differently When Picking Up Mating Calls
2013-07-08 14:30:46

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A joint team of Japanese and Danish researchers has found various moth species taking Salt-n-Pepa's suggestion to the next level -- talking about sex in a variety of ways. Lepidopterists have thought for years that moths use their sense of hearing to avoid predation from bats. However, the new study, which was published in Scientific Reports, revealed that their tiny ears are also used to detect the mating whispers of other moths....

Moths Jam Bat Echolocation Systems
2013-07-05 09:04:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For years, the military has used radio signals to jam an enemy's radar and a new study in the journal Biology Letters suggests hawk moths use the same technique to evade predation by bats. According to the study's authors from the University of Florida, hawk moths emit sonic pulses from their genitals in response to the high-frequency echolocation that bats produce to locate prey. "This is just the first step toward understanding a...

Military Sonar Disrupts Behavior Of Blue Whales
2013-07-03 14:31:38

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study has found whales do not care for the sound of the sonar used by militaries to detect submarines. Researchers from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, have observed the behavior of whales as they come into areas where sonar is being used and found these marine mammals may even avoid venturing into new feeding areas when they hear sonar. The results of this research suggest militaries should refrain from...

UK Team Uses Echolocation To Produce Highly Detailed Bat Maps
2013-07-03 12:42:13

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Using over 15,000 recordings of echolocation sounds gathered from across the UK countryside, researchers from the University of Leeds have rendered the most detailed, large-scale maps of bat distribution in northern England. According to the researchers, the bat maps are especially significant because the animals represent about 25 percent of all of the UK's native mammal species and can be a canary-in-the-coal-mine, ecologically...

Echoes And Algorithm 3D Map Of Room
2013-06-19 08:35:25

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers have developed a new algorithm that makes it possible to map the shape and dimensions of a room using just a few microphones and a snap of the fingers. Developed at the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, the algorithm models a room using echoes produced from sound, similar to the way in which bats and dolphins emit sounds in order to navigate. This...

High-Pitched Echolocation Helps Harbor Porpoises Avoid Killer Whales
2013-06-12 14:17:20

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) have determined why harbour porpoises are doing so well in coastal and busy waters. The team wrote in the journal Frontiers in Physiology that these animals are able to thrive through the Northern Hemisphere due to their sophisticated echolocation abilities. Coastal waters like the ones harbor porpoises live in can be challenging for whales due to the risk of beaching and...

Amelia Earhart's Electra Possibly Found Via Sonar Data
2013-06-02 05:03:47

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A sonar image collected off the cost of Nikumaroro Island in the Pacific Ocean contains an object that could be the wing from Amelia Earhart´s long-lost Lockheed Electra, various media outlets reported over the weekend. Earhart, the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, disappeared during a flight over the Pacific in July of 1937, and Nina Golgowski of the New York Daily News reports that evidence suggests she...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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