Quantcast

Latest Songbird Stories

Songbirds Sing In 3D
2013-01-08 19:14:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Since both human and songbird infants learn vocal communication at an early age, the cognitive mechanisms behind bird songs have a rich history of groundbreaking research. However, an international team of scientists decided to take a deeper look into the physical mechanics behind birds´ vocalizations, according to a new study in the open access journal BMC Biology. "We know quite a bit about how the songbird brain...

2012-11-20 22:52:39

Study looks at what makes flycatchers change their song length Do birds change their tune in response to urban noise? It depends on the bird species, according to Dr. Alejandro Ariel Ríos-Chelén from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and colleagues. Their work shows that while some birds do adapt their songs in noisy conditions by means of frequency changes, others like the vermilion flycatchers adapt their song by means of...

2011-03-31 07:00:00

NORTH BRUNSWICK, N.J., March 31, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Songbird Hearing Inc., a leading developer and manufacturer of high-quality, low-cost hearing devices, today announced the launch of its Songbird® Clear(TM) sound enhancement device to consumers online and through leading retailers nationwide. Songbird Clear is the world's first high-quality, low-cost sound enhancement device available at retail for consumers who want to sharpen their hearing in hard-to-hear...

c1a34d4b0b71e6de1fed51748523c5071
2010-06-30 07:31:25

Wide range of pitch is due to vocal muscles more than air pressure Female zebra finches don't sing but make one-note, low-pitch calls. Males sing over a wide range of frequencies. University of Utah scientists discovered how: The males' stronger vocal muscles, not the pressure of air flowing through their lungs, lets them sing from the B note above middle C all the way to a whistle beyond the high end of a piano keyboard. "You have two variables "“ air pressure and muscle activity...

12a18fe06ccc72213a00e65dfc1a4fd51
2010-03-31 12:55:00

A genomic achievement that's for the birds -- and for humans An international research consortium has identified more than 800 genes that appear to play a role in the male zebra finch's ability to learn elaborate songs from his father. The researchers also found evidence that song behavior engages complex gene regulatory networks within the brain of the songbird"“ networks that rely on parts of the genome once considered junk. The zebra finch genome sequence and analysis published in...

2010-01-06 12:27:00

LAS VEGAS, Jan. 6 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Royal Philips Electronics (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHI) and Songbird today announced a strategic partnership to include the Songbird media player on the 2010 line of Philips GoGear portable audio video players. Philips Songbird, one simple program to discover, play, and sync music and media, will be available worldwide for the 2010 line-up of Philips GoGear players including the new GoGear Muse, GoGear Vibe, GoGear Mix, GoGear Aria, GoGear Spark, GoGear...

c6e8581516899d32ddc2dde7a9e1dbee1
2009-01-09 12:20:00

Birdsongs are used extensively as models for animal signaling and human speech, offering a glimpse of how our own communicating abilities developed. A new study by Adrienne DuBois, a graduate student at the University of Miami (UM) College of Arts and Sciences Department of Biology, shows that the Swamp Sparrow has the ability to emit songs that are physically difficult to produce during hostile situations, implying that songbirds use sophisticated vocal performances as signals in aggressive...

8f9a149dabc4afa5999ec92235ae28bd1
2008-12-11 17:04:42

A group of five endemic and recently extinct Hawaiian songbird species were historically classified as "honeyeaters" due to striking similarities to birds of the same name in Australia and neighboring islands in the South Pacific. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution, however, have recently discovered that the Hawaiian birds, commonly known as the oo's and the kioea, share no close relationship with the other honeyeaters and in fact represent a new and distinct family of birds "”...

5d445e1ca6b30774b959de3e3e285bca1
2008-11-13 12:55:00

A new study shows that songbirds learn to sing from a hymn sheet in their head. Researchers found a region of the Zebra Finch brain had what they believe to be an internal recording of how the birds ought to be singing. The Swiss research team wrote in the journal Nature that a separate region of the brain seems to enable birds to identify mistakes in their songs. According to scientists from Zurich University this research could shed light on how humans learn to speak. The electrical...


Latest Songbird Reference Libraries

White-winged Fairy-wren, Malurus leucopterus
2009-07-17 11:00:21

The White-winged Fairy-wren (Malurus leucopterus) is a unique species of passerine bird in the Maluridae family. This bird can be found from the middle of Queensland and South Australia to the other side of Western Australia. Similar to other fairy-wrens, males express a strong intensity of sexual dimorphism and feathers change to shining colors during breeding season. The female is the smaller of the two and has a sandy-brown body with soft-blue tail feathers. The male's feathers change...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.