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Latest Sonoma State University Stories

2009-04-23 13:07:10

An international team of astronomers has used a U.S. radio telescope to study the brightest galaxies that the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope can see. Yuri Kovalev at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Germany said the study solidifies the link between an active galaxy's gamma-ray emissions and its powerful radio-emitting jets. Kovalev and colleagues used the world's largest radio telescope -- the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array -- a set of 10 radio...

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2009-04-23 09:32:24

An international team of astronomers has used the world's biggest radio telescope to look deep into the brightest galaxies that NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope can see. The study solidifies the link between an active galaxy's gamma-ray emissions and its powerful radio-emitting jets. "Now we know for sure that the fastest, most compact, and brightest jets we see with radio telescopes are the ones that are able to kick light up to the highest energies," said Yuri Kovalev, a team member...

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2009-03-11 12:35:00

A new map combining nearly three months of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is giving astronomers an unprecedented look at the high-energy cosmos. To Fermi's eyes, the universe is ablaze with gamma rays from sources within the solar system to galaxies billions of light-years away. "Fermi has given us a deeper and better-resolved view of the gamma-ray sky than any previous space mission," said Peter Michelson, the lead scientist for the spacecraft's Large Area Telescope (LAT)...

2009-03-11 09:55:00

GREENBELT, Md., March 11 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new map combining nearly three months of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is giving astronomers an unprecedented look at the high-energy cosmos. To Fermi's eyes, the universe is ablaze with gamma rays from sources ranging from within the solar system to galaxies billions of light-years away. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) "Fermi has given us a deeper and better-resolved view of the...

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2008-08-26 15:40:00

WASHINGTON -- NASA's newest observatory, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, or GLAST, has begun its mission of exploring the universe in high-energy gamma rays. The spacecraft and its revolutionary instruments passed their orbital checkout with flying colors. NASA announced today that GLAST has been renamed the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The new name honors Prof. Enrico Fermi (1901 - 1954), a pioneer in high-energy physics. "Enrico Fermi was the first person to suggest how...

2008-07-02 12:00:00

Several bases of operations for NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) are gearing up for data from the recently launched satellite. Operations centers preparing for data from GLAST include NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in Menlo Park, Calif. NASA Goddard is responsible for several aspects of GLAST's mission as it begins transmitting data for the world to...

2008-06-19 15:00:05

The U.S. space agency says its newest space telescope, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, or GLAST, is in the process of being activated. The Delta II rocket carrying GLAST lifted off June 11 from launch pad 17-B at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. It is in orbit approximately 350 miles above the Earth and running well, officials said. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration said its engineers for the next month, will be busy turning on and checking the...

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2008-06-19 11:04:45

Less than a week after launch, NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, or GLAST, is safely up-and-running well in orbit approximately 350 miles (565 kilometers) above Earth's surface. GLAST was successfully launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 12:05 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, June 11. For four weeks, engineers will continue to be busy around the clock turning on and checking out the various components on the spacecraft. "Things are looking...

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2008-06-11 13:00:00

Today, NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST for short) left Earth onboard a Delta II rocket. "The entire GLAST Team is elated," reported program manager Kevin Grady of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center shortly after the rocket's liftoff from Cape Canaveral. "The observatory is now on-orbit and all systems continue to operate as planned." What is NASA's newest space telescope going to accomplish? GLAST will explore the most extreme environments in the universe, searching for...

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2008-06-10 22:00:00

In a final meeting of scientists, engineers, technicians and officials, NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) received the final "Ready to Go!" from all teams. GLAST is scheduled to launch on a United Launch Alliance's Delta II Heavy rocket with a launch window from 11:45 a.m. - 1:40 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, June 11. During the "Launch Readiness Review," a two hour meeting at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla., held on June 9, the U.S. Air Force, NASA and United Launch Alliance...