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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 9:20 EDT

Latest Soo-Yeun Lee Stories

2010-12-07 14:15:26

University of Illinois scientists have learned to mask the bitterness of ginseng, a common ingredient of energy drinks. "Consumers like to see ginseng on a product's ingredient list because studies show that it improves memory, enhances libido and sexual performance, boosts immunity, and alleviates diabetes. But the very compounds that make ginseng good for you also make it taste bitter," said Soo-Yeun Lee, a U of I associate professor of food science and human nutrition. In an earlier study,...

2010-10-20 12:28:32

University of Illinois scientists think they have solved an interesting problem: how to get protein-deficient Indian schoolchildren to consume soy, an inexpensive and complete vegetable protein. What's more, they've joined forces with an Indian foundation that can get the high-protein soy snack they've developed into the hands of 1.2 million hungry kids who need it. "Although the country has decidedly vegetarian tastes, the Indian people just don't care for soy," said Soo-Yeun Lee, a U of I...

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2008-03-06 15:55:00

Breakfast of champions? That would be a soy protein-packed, low-fat, high-fiber cereal that meets the requirements for three different FDA health claims and leaves you feeling full so you won't be tempted to eat again until lunch.University of Illinois scientist Soo-Yeun Lee has cooked up a "recipe" for just such a cereal, one that's passed the taste test of her sensory panel."There are lots of good reasons to eat soy--and even more reasons to consume soy protein at breakfast," said Soo-Yeun...