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Latest Space exploration Stories

NASA Renames Radiation Belt Mission
2012-11-10 09:36:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online NASA announced the renaming of a recently launched mission to study the radiation belts to the Van Allen Probes in honor of the late James Van Allen, head of the physics department at the University of Iowa. Van Allen discovered the radiation belts encircling Earth in 1958. NASA announced the new name, previously the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), at a ceremony at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory...

NASA Testing Internet In Space
2012-11-09 13:00:50

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online NASA has demonstrated the future of the Internet in space, showing how one day space vehicles and habitats could be equipped with the Internet. Space station Expedition 33 commander Sunita Williams used a NASA-developed laptop in October to remotely drive a small LEGO robot at the European Space Observatory Center in Darmstadt, Germany. The experiment used NASA's Disruption Tolerant Network (DTN) to simulate a scenario in which an...

2012-10-24 14:34:59

NASA has selected 10 university-led proposals for study of innovative, early-stage space technologies designed to improve shielding from space radiation, spacecraft thermal management and optical systems. The 1-year grants are worth approximately $250,000 each, with an additional year of research possible. Each of these technology areas requires dramatic improvements over existing capabilities for future science and human exploration missions. Early stage, or low technology readiness level...

Space Radiation Forecasts In Real Time
2012-10-16 14:06:24

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Astrophysicists have created the first online system for predicting and forecasting the radiation environment in near-Earth, lunar, and Martian space environments. The University of New Hampshire's Space Science Center (SSC) astrophysicists created the near real-time tool to provide critical information for potential manned missions to the moon and Mars. "If we send human beings back to the moon, and especially if we're able to go...

Year-Long Manned Missions In Space Could Be A Reality By 2015
2012-10-03 09:40:33

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It has been decided by International Space Station (ISS) partners that special crews aboard the orbiting lab will partake in year-long missions potentially beginning in March 2015, doubling the current standard of six months in space, according to a report by Ria Novosti news agency. “The principal decision has been made and we just have to coordinate the formalities,” Alexei Krasnov, the head of Roscosmos human space...


Latest Space exploration Reference Libraries

History Of Space Exploration
2013-10-06 08:29:34

Space exploration is the exploration and discovery of outer space by use of space technology and is conducted by both robotic spacecraft and humans. Astronomy, which is the viewing of objects in space from Earth, is thought to predate recorded history, but it was the inspiration to modern space exploration. Humans explore space for many reasons including the survival of humankind if Earth cannot sustain life, uniting nations, and scientific research. Physical space exploration began in...

Roger K. Crouch
2012-08-17 17:13:52

Roger Crouch is an American scientist and a NASA astronaut. He was born Roger Keith Crouch on September 12, 1940 in Jamestown, Tennessee. Crouch grew up participating in the Eagle Scouts of America and went to high school at the Alvin C. York Institute. He then went to attend Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, where he earned a Bachelor of Science in physics in 1962. That same year he became a group leader and researcher at the NASA Langley Research Center, where he stayed until 1985. With his...

sts-74
2012-05-12 09:29:42

Atlantis launched from Kennedy Space Center on November 12 at 7:30 AM EST and landed at Kennedy on November 20, 1995 at 12:01 PM EST. The shuttle orbited 129 times at an altitude of 213 nautical miles at an inclination of 51.6 degrees and travelled 3.4 million miles. The mission lasted 8 days, 4 hours, 30 minutes, and 44 seconds. STS-74 marked the second docking of a U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir, continuing Phase I activities leading to construction of International...

sts-58
2012-05-12 09:00:40

Columbia launched from Kennedy Space Center on October 18, 19993 at 110:53 AM EDT and landed at Edwards AFB on November 1 at 7:05 AM PDT. The shuttle orbited 225 times at an altitude of 155 nautical miles at an inclination of 155 nautical miles and travelled 5.8 million miles. The mission lasted 14 days, 0 hours, 12 minutes, and 32 seconds. This was a Spacelab mission and the longest shuttle mission to date.  Shannon Lucid accumulated the most hours for a female astronaut at 838. The...

sts-54
2012-05-12 08:54:50

Endeavour launched from Kennedy Space Center on January 13, 1993 at 8:59 AM EST and landed at Kennedy on January 19 at 8:37 AM EST. The shuttle orbited 96 times at an altitude of 165 nautical miles at an inclination of 28.45 degrees. The mission lasted 5 days, 23 hours, 38 minutes, and 19 seconds. The primary payload was the fifth Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-F) which was deployed on day one of the mission. It was later successfully transferred to its proper orbit by the...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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