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Latest Spanish flu research Stories

2014-05-09 13:32:00

PLOS Certain influenza strains are highly virulent—they cause more serious disease and kill more people. Some of the damage is caused by the stronger immune response such strains elicit, especially in the lung. A study published on May 8th in PLOS Pathogens identifies SOCS4 as a key regulator of the immune response against influenza virus. Lukasz Kedzierski, Sandra Nicholson, and colleagues from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research and the University of Melbourne,...

Bird Flu Genetic Analysis Reveals Easy Adaptation To Humans
2013-04-15 08:06:19

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The new bird flu strain that has so far killed 11 people in China has been showing signs that it is quickly adapting to mammalian (particularly human) hosts, according to a new study led by Masato Tashiro of the Influenza Virus Research Center at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID) in Japan, along with Yoshiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UWMadison) and the University of Tokyo. Despite the...

2012-01-27 10:27:03

Researchers at Michigan State University (MSU) have demonstrated how a new virus evolves, shedding light on how easy it can be for diseases to gain dangerous mutations. The findings appear in the current issue of the journal Science. The scientists showed for the first time how the virus called "Lambda" evolved to find a new way to attack host cells, an innovation that took four mutations to accomplish. This virus infects bacteria, in particular the common E. coli bacterium. Lambda isn't...

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2012-01-27 09:04:37

Researchers at Michigan State University (MSU) have demonstrated how a new virus evolves, shedding light on how easy it can be for diseases to gain dangerous mutations. The findings appear in the current issue of the journal Science. The scientists showed for the first time how the virus called "Lambda" evolved to find a new way to attack host cells, an innovation that took four mutations to accomplish. This virus infects bacteria, in particular the common E. coli bacterium. Lambda isn't...

2011-09-19 23:32:21

Examination of lung tissue and other autopsy material from 68 American soldiers who died of respiratory infections in 1918 has revealed that the influenza virus that eventually killed 50 million people worldwide was circulating in the United States at least four months before the 1918 influenza reached pandemic levels that fall. The study, using tissues preserved since 1918, was led by Jeffery K. Taubenberger, M.D., Ph.D., of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases...

2011-01-18 15:17:55

A collaborative project between researchers at the Trudeau Institute and their colleagues at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., offers new insights that may lead to an improved strategy to protect against the influenza virus and other viruses that infect the respiratory tract. The study examines the migration of white blood cells to the mucosal tissues of the nose in response to a viral infection. "As a result of this study, we learned that cells arrive early during the...

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2010-06-10 10:52:50

New therapeutic prospect: Tipping the balance to encourage flu death Scientists have uncovered the flu's secret formula for effectively evolving within and between host species: balance. The key lies with the flu's unique replication process, which has evolved to produce enough mutations for the virus to spread and adapt to its host environment, but not so many that unwanted genomic mutations lead to the flu's demise (catastrophic mutagenesis). These findings overturn long-held assumptions...

2009-08-31 11:54:50

German researchers say they determined viral polymerase might provide a new therapeutic target for host-adapted avian influenza. The scientists said highly pathogenic avian influenza, commonly known as bird flu, is a strain of the influenza virus that has adapted to infect birds. Although bird-specific flu strains rarely cross species, further adaption can lead to lethal infection in humans, the researchers said. To determine which genetic changes may lead to host adaptation, Gulsah Gabriel...

2008-08-18 18:00:08

By Seth Borenstein WASHINGTON - Nearly a century after history's most lethal flu faded away, survivors' bloodstreams still carry super-potent protection against the 1918 virus, demonstrating the remarkable durability of the human immune system. Scientists tested the blood of 32 people aged 92 to 102 who were exposed to the 1918 pandemic flu and found antibodies that still roam the body looking to strangle the old flu strain. Researchers manipulated those antibodies into a vaccine and...

2008-07-10 18:00:47

A U.S. medical team has found a way of spotting genes that help spread the bird flu, the subject of global concern as a potential pandemic threat. The University of Wisconsin-Madison team, led by virology Professor Yoshihiro Kawaoka, says it hopes its work will help researchers quickly develop effective new drugs to combat the fast-evolving flu and other viruses that threaten to cause widespread sickness and economic devastation. Viruses spread by commandeering genes, proteins and...


Word of the Day
maffling
  • To stammer.
  • Present participle of maffle, to stammer.
  • A simpleton.
The word 'maffle' may come from a Dutch word meaning 'to move the jaws' or a French word meaning 'having large cheeks'.