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Latest Spanish National Cancer Research Centre Stories

2014-07-10 12:34:40

Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO) The pluripotency factor NANOG regulates cell proliferation in epithelia of the skin and oesophagus in adult organisms; blocking the action of the gene diminishes the capacity of tumour cells to divide Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have discovered that NANOG, an essential gene for embryonic stem cells, also regulates cell division in stratified epithelia—those that form part of the epidermis of...

2014-06-24 14:07:18

Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO) New mutations in cohesin proteins, which are closely associated with cell division, are very common in various types of cancers such as bladder cancer and melanoma Massive sequencing of cancer genomes brings to light new genes every day that could be involved in the process of tumour formation. A good example of this is cohesin, a ring-shaped protein complex that embraces DNA to control cell division. Just a few months ago, and...

2014-04-04 12:23:54

These genes could explain why some women with high-risk mutations suffer from cancer while others do not Today we know that women carrying BCRA1 and BCRA2 gene mutations have a 43% to 88% risk of developing from breast cancer before the age of 70. Taking critical decisions such as opting for preventive surgery when the risk bracket is so wide is not easy. Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) researchers are conducting a study that will contribute towards giving every woman far...

2013-11-20 17:37:34

PrimPol allows cells to make copies of their DNA even when it is damaged, and prevents breaks in the chromosomes Every day, the human body produces new cells to regenerate tissues and repair those that have suffered injury. Each time this happens, the cells make copies of their DNA that they will pass on to the resulting daughter cells. This process of copying the DNA, also called replication, is very delicate, given that it can generate severe alterations in the DNA that are associated...

2013-11-19 13:16:54

An original model that would explain how regions of the genome that are copied later on facilitate the birth of new genes with specific functions in tissues and organs One of the most important processes in the life of cells is genome replication, which consists of making exact copies of the DNA in order to pass it on to their offspring when they split. In most organisms, from yeast to human beings, genome replication follows a set plan, in which certain regions of the genome replicate...

2013-10-08 13:26:58

A study led by Marcos Malumbres, head of CNIO's Cell Division & Cancer Group, identifies a new molecular mechanism that regulates genome stability and cell proliferation Cell division is an essential process for the development of an organism. This process, however, can cause tumor growth when it stops working properly. Tumor cells accumulate alterations in their genetic material, and this makes them divide in an uncontrolled fashion, thus encouraging growth of the tumor. Over the past...

2013-07-19 23:20:39

In a study, a gene was found to be the key role in obesity. Prescopodene Nutritionals feels they have a way to combat genetics with a diet supplement to help control weight. Washington, USA (PRWEB) July 19, 2013 In an article found on Sciencedaily.com, researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) discovered the key role of the gene RAP1, a gene that protects telomeres – the ends of chromosomes – and it’s link to obesity. "We still don't know what...

2013-06-21 10:49:14

RAP1 is a gene that also protects telomeres. This is the first time that a link has been found between these structures that shorten with ageing and obesity The discovery of an unexpected function for a gene that was associated to another process in the organism might be a solution in search of a problem, a clue to unsuspected connections. That is what has happened with RAP1, a gene that protects telomeres— the ends of chromosomes—after researchers from the Spanish National Cancer...

Evolutionary History Of Cancer-related Gene Tracked By CNIO Study
2013-06-06 20:59:35

Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO) The study reveals how a genetic duplication that occurred millions of years ago encouraged the evolution of the ASF1b gene, involved in cancer development How and when evolution generates diversity or gives form to proteins, living beings' functional building blocks, are essential questions that still surround the theory of evolution. In humans, the majority of genes have emerged via genetic duplication, a strategy in which a gene...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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