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Latest Speciation Stories

sunflower facts
2014-10-16 03:30:41

Provided by Cheryl Dybas, NSF As fall fields turn bright with color, what might we learn from roadside rows of sunflowers - and the sunflower seeds widely used to feed birds in colder weather? Scientists are finding that answers to biological and environmental questions large and small may be hidden in the petals of common sunflowers. For example, how frequently and under what conditions does evolution take the same path? When independent populations evolve the same characteristics,...

ants sympatric speciation
2014-08-25 03:00:57

Peter Iglinski, University of Rochester A newly-discovered species of ant supports a controversial theory of species formation. The ant, only found in a single patch of eucalyptus trees on the São Paulo State University campus in Brazil, branched off from its original species while living in the same colony, something thought rare in current models of evolutionary development. “Most new species come about in geographic isolation,” said Christian Rabeling, assistant professor of...

2014-07-15 09:59:46

University of Oxford Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed study of how plants use 'doubles' of their genomes reveals. The findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties. Oxford University researchers captured a 'genetic snapshot' of maize as it existed 10 million years ago when the plant made a double of its genome – a 'whole genome duplication' event. They then traced how maize evolved to use these...

Researchers Remap The Epic Evolution Of A 'Ring Species'
2014-05-26 03:58:52

University of British Columbia The Greenish Warbler, long considered an idealized example of a single species that diverged into two as it expanded its range, has a much more checkered family history than biologists previously realized. Ring species are a continuous loop of related populations, each adapted to its local environment, with two terminal populations in the loop meeting but now unable to mate. But an in-depth genomic analysis published today in Nature by University of...

Geneticists Map Genome Of An Important Global Crop: The Peanut
2014-04-03 07:29:48

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Peanuts are seemingly everywhere in the US. From cooking oils to candy bars, peanuts are a part of our lives, and a big business. And now, for the first time, a multinational group of crop geneticists has sequenced the peanut genome. The researchers are from the International Peanut Genome Initiative (IPGI), led by Scott Jackson, who serves as chair of the IPGI. Jackson is also the director of the University of Georgia Center for...

Scientists Identify Factors Limiting Hybridization Of Closely-related Woodrat Species
2014-03-31 08:41:24

Wildlife Conservation Society A pair of new studies from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Idaho State University, and the University of Nevada Reno look at the surprising variety of factors that prevent two closely related species of woodrats from becoming a single hybrid species despite the existence of hybrid individuals where the two species come into contact. After finding that two closely related species, the desert and Bryant's woodrats, could interbreed and produce hybrid...

2014-01-29 11:17:50

Ever since the nineteenth century scientists have recognized that some regions contain more species than others, and that the tropics are richer in biodiversity than temperate regions. But why are there more species in the tropics? A new study publishing 28 January in the Open Access journal PLOS Biology scrutinizes most of the living mammalian species and reveals a two-fold mechanism; the rate at which mammals arose was higher in the tropics, and the rate at which they became extinct lower....

Clymene Dolphin Natural Hybridization
2014-01-09 12:44:22

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Natural hybridization between two dolphin species likely helped to bring about the mysterious clymene dolphin, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. Researchers from several institutions found in a molecular analysis that spinner dolphins and striped dolphins helped create the clymene dolphin. Questions about the clymene dolphin’s origins have been unanswered for many years, so the team from the...

Butterflies Offer Insights Into Evolution
2013-10-31 16:39:31

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the University of Chicago finds it’s genetically easier to spin off into a new species than it may have once been thought, even if the two species remain close and interbreed with one another. After studying butterflies, the researchers found evolution can happen as the result of a process rather than a single event. In fact, in the case of butterflies, the beginning of a new species could begin with something as...

Kiwi Genome Reveals A Few Surprises
2013-10-27 05:36:19

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists working to sequence the genome of the kiwifruit have revealed that the berry has recently undergone a pair of whole-genome duplication events, according to new research published earlier this month in the journal Nature Communications. Zhangjun Fei, an associate professor at the Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University, and his colleagues also discovered that there were many similarities between the kiwi’s more...


Latest Speciation Reference Libraries

39_b28590aeccf7d5e65ad920a431957a2b
2007-06-24 20:15:53

The Three-Spined Stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, is a fish native to much of northern Europe, northern Asia and North America. It has been introduced into parts of southern and central Europe. Three subspecies that are currently recognized by the IUCN are Gasterosteus aculeatus aculeatus, which is found in most of the species range, and is the subspecies most strictly termed the Three-Spined Stickleback; its common name in England is the Tiddler, although "tittlebat" is also sometimes...

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Word of the Day
maffling
  • To stammer.
  • Present participle of maffle, to stammer.
  • A simpleton.
The word 'maffle' may come from a Dutch word meaning 'to move the jaws' or a French word meaning 'having large cheeks'.