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Latest Species Stories

Queen Of Spades Key To New Evolutionary Hypothesis
2012-05-11 03:02:13

Microscopic ocean plankton mimic card also known as the Black Queen Sleight of hand is a trait that belongs mainly to humans. Or so scientists thought. Studies of common, microscopic ocean plankton named Prochlorococcus show that humans aren't the only ones who can play a mean game of cards. Their method lurks in the Black Queen Hypothesis, as it's called, after the Queen of Spades in the card game Hearts. Scientists Jeffrey Morris and Richard Lenski of Michigan State...

2012-05-09 21:22:44

Researchers have found that bird species with multiple plumage color forms within in the same population, evolve into new species faster than those with only one color form, confirming a 60 year-old evolution theory. The global study used information from birdwatchers and geneticists accumulated over decades and was conducted by University of Melbourne scientists Dr Devi Stuart-Fox and Dr Andrew Hugall (now based at the Melbourne Museum) and is published in the journal Nature. The link...

2012-05-03 18:36:41

Cypress distribution reflects the breakup of Pangaea In classical mythology, the cypress tree is associated with death, the underworld and eternity. Indeed, the family to which cypresses belong, is an ancient lineage of conifers, and a new study of their evolution affords a unique insight into a turbulent era in the Earth´s history. During the geological era known as the Mesozoic, the continental crust was concentrated in a single huge landmass, the supercontinent Pangea. Pangea...

Australias Government Gives Koalas Threatend Species Status
2012-05-01 06:32:21

For the first time ever, koalas in some parts of Australia have been listed as a threatened species by the Australian government. Facing serious threats from climate change and urban expansion, koala populations in the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Queensland have made their way onto the nation´s vulnerable species list. The list was created to keep development away from the areas where the koalas are threatened. Over the past 2 decades, the koala population has...

Darwinian Selection Continues To Influence Human Evolution
2012-04-30 14:25:37

New evidence proves humans are continuing to evolve and that significant natural and sexual selection is still taking place in our species in the modern world. Despite advancements in medicine and technology, as well as an increased prevalence of monogamy, research reveals humans are continuing to evolve just like other species. Scientists in an international collaboration, which includes the University of Sheffield, analyzed church records of about 6,000 Finnish people born between...

Leeches To Track Mammal DNA In Jungles
2012-04-24 06:10:55

Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com Researchers from Copenhagen Zoo and the University of Copenhagen have discovered a way to track mammals in the jungles of Southeast Asia. Scientists collected leeches from the jungles to analyze the blood and DNA of animals taken by the parasites. With this new method, researchers will be able to study the biodiversity of the mammals without having to track each one down. The findings, to be published in science journal Current Biology, allow scientists to...

Ravens Remember Relationships They Had With Others
2012-04-19 11:49:38

In daily life we remember faces and voices of several known individuals. Similarly, mammals have been shown to remember calls and faces of known individuals after a number of years. Markus Boeckle and Thomas Bugnyar from the Department of Cognitive Biology of the University of Vienna show in their recent article, published in Current Biology, that ravens differentiate individuals based on familiarity. Additionally, they discovered that ravens memorize relationship valence and affiliation....

2012-04-19 11:23:56

Study of simple organisms reveals preference for those who resemble themselves In a dog-eat-dog world of ruthless competition and 'survival of the fittest,' new research from the University of Leicester reveals that individuals are genetically programmed to work together and cooperate with those who most resemble themselves. A tendency for similar individuals to cooperate selectively with one another, even if they are not close relatives, can evolve spontaneously in simple organisms....

2012-04-09 13:24:01

Courtship rituals can be all-consuming, demanding time and effort — but now scientists have discovered why it might be worth it Courtship rituals can be all-consuming, demanding time and effort — but now scientists have discovered why it might be worth it. Attracting a mate — which can take significant effort, such as in a peacock's show of feathers or the exhaustive rutting of stags — can produce benefits for a species in the long term, a study suggests....


Latest Species Reference Libraries

Paleozoology
2013-09-30 13:34:57

Paleozoology, also spelled Palaeozoology, is a branch of many other sciences including zoology and paleontology that focuses on recovering cellular matter from animal remains that are large enough to be seen without the help of a microscope, known as macrofossils. This study is primarily used in the context of archeology and geology and aids in recreating ancient ecosystems and prehistoric environments. Paleozoologists study the tissues of many types of animals including sharks, echinoderms,...

39_b28590aeccf7d5e65ad920a431957a2b
2007-06-24 20:15:53

The Three-Spined Stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, is a fish native to much of northern Europe, northern Asia and North America. It has been introduced into parts of southern and central Europe. Three subspecies that are currently recognized by the IUCN are Gasterosteus aculeatus aculeatus, which is found in most of the species range, and is the subspecies most strictly termed the Three-Spined Stickleback; its common name in England is the Tiddler, although "tittlebat" is also sometimes...

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Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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