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Latest Speleology Stories

Social Bats More Likely To Pay Higher Price From White-nose Syndrome
2012-07-04 08:13:54

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online New studies conducted by biologists at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) show that the effects of white-nose syndrome, a deadly bat disease, may be worse in bat colonies who are increasingly social during hibernation. The study found that bat species that tend to cluster together during hibernation, even with declining populations, would continue to spread white-nose syndrome. In 2006, white-nose syndrome made a dramatic...

Cases Confirmed Of White-nose Syndrome in Endangered Gray Bats
2012-05-31 03:32:58

White-nose syndrome (WNS) has devastated bat populations throughout eastern North America since its discovery in New York in 2006. This disease, which has advanced into nineteen states and four Canada provinces, has even devastated entire colonies of bats in some regions. Common symptoms include gathering near hibernating dens, and flying about during the cold days of winter. Bats have been found dying and ill on the ground outside of their hibernating areas. Recently, the U.S. Fish and...

2012-04-12 23:01:13

Two Bucknell professors have received a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service grant to find out whether certain genetic characteristics, behavior and environmental factors contribute to the severity of the white-nose syndrome, which has killed up to 6.7 million bats in eastern North America. LEWISBURG, Pa. (PRWEB) April 12, 2012 Two Bucknell University biologists are leading an investigation into how and why some bats survive — and others die — when exposed to the tell-tale fungus...

2012-04-11 23:01:07

With 6.7 million bats already dead, scientists believe the fast-spreading disease called White-nose Syndrome could lead to the extinction of some species. Lewisburg, PA (PRWEB) April 10, 2012 More than six million bats are dead, and millions more are expected to fall victim to a disease known as White-nose Syndrome, or WNS. First identified in the northeastern United States, WNS has wiped out an estimated 95% of Pennsylvania´s bat population and is quickly spreading across the country....

Bat-killing Fungus Traveled From Europe
2012-04-11 12:44:31

A new report released Monday says a European fungus is responsible for the deaths of millions of bats in the United States and Canada. It has long been a suspicion that an invasive species was responsible for carrying the deadly fungus. This research confirms the carrier was not native to North America. European bats have not been as vulnerable to “white nose syndrome,” the name of the fungal disease responsible for the deaths of American and Canadian bats alike. According to...

Bat Death Toll From White-nose Syndrome Keeps Climbing
2012-01-18 13:08:42

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said on Tuesday that the death toll for bats in North America that have suffered from White-nose Syndrome has exceeded 5.5 million. Biologists and partners of the service estimated that at least 5.7 million to 6.7 million bats have died from white-nose syndrome (WNS). The syndrome was first documented in New York in 2006, and the disease quickly spread into 16 states and four Canadian provinces. Bats with WNS have symptoms like flying around outside...

2011-06-02 10:00:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., June 2, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Two popular caves within the Forbes State Forest, Coon Cave in Westmoreland County and Barton Cave in Fayette County, will soon be reopened to the public for recreational caving, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources announced today. A third cave, Lemon Hole in Westmoreland County, will remain closed. Beginning in the summer of 2006, the caves were gated from the beginning of October until the end of May due to...

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2011-04-01 06:40:00

The deaths of insect-eating bats in North America could have serious economic impacts on the United States, costing the agriculture industry some as much as $53 billion a year, according to a new analysis by U.S. and South African researchers published in the journal Science. A fungal disease called white nose syndrome, combined with a growing number of wind turbines, which can ensnare the bats, have killed off more than one million bats in North America since 2006. The deaths eliminate a...

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2011-02-15 07:00:00

Culling will not stop the spread of a deadly fungus that is threatening to wipe out hibernating bats in North America, according to a new mathematical model. White-nose syndrome, which is estimated to have killed over a million bats in a three year period, is probably caused by a newly discovered cold-adapted fungus, Geomyces destructans. The new model examines how WNS is passed from bat to bat and concludes that culling would not work because of the complexity of bat life history and because...


Latest Speleology Reference Libraries

European Free-tailed Bat, Tadarida teniotis or Tadarida insignis
2013-06-18 12:46:10

The European free-tailed bat (Tadarida teniotis or Tadarida insignis) is a species of free-tailed bat that is native to many areas in the Old World. It was reportedly seen in Korea in 1931, but no other reports have been recorded since that year. The body length of this species reaches between 3.3 inches and 3.7 inches, with a wing length of up to 2.5 inches. The European free-tailed bat appears on the IUCN Red List with a conservation status of “Least Concern.” Image Caption: European...

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.