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2011-02-03 12:33:17

New fungus has killed 1 million bats in eastern US; heading westA team of wildlife experts led by UC Davis called today for a national fight against a new fungus that has killed more than 1 million bats in the eastern United States and is spreading fast throughout North America."If we lose bats, we lose keystone species in some communities, predators that consume enormous numbers of insects, and beautiful wildlife species that are important parts of North America's biodiversity," said Janet...

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2011-01-19 11:32:51

New fungus has killed 1 million bats in eastern US; heading west A team of wildlife experts led by UC Davis called today for a national fight against a new fungus that has killed more than 1 million bats in the eastern United States and is spreading fast throughout North America. "If we lose bats, we lose keystone species in some communities, predators that consume enormous numbers of insects, and beautiful wildlife species that are important parts of North America's biodiversity," said Janet...

2010-11-23 00:01:07

Nature Conservancy Scientists Compete for $250K to Save Bats from Mysterious Ailment Nashville, TN (Vocus) November 22, 2010 The bats that eat millions of mosquitoes in American backyards every summer could be driven to extinction by a mysterious illness that's spreading across the country, and Nature Conservancy cave expert Cory Holliday hopes he can help save them by building a better bat cave. Holliday and The Nature Conservancy in Tennessee are in the running for a $250,000 grant from...

2010-11-17 21:15:43

Scientists are looking for answers "” including commercial bathroom disinfectants and over-the-counter fungicides used to fight athlete's foot "” to help in the battle against a strange fungus that threatens bat populations in the United States. That's the topic of an article in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS' weekly newsmagazine. C&EN Senior Correspondent Stephen K. Ritter notes that despite their poor public image, bats are beneficial....

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2010-09-13 09:40:00

Researchers at the New York State Department of Health have identified a handful of drugs and antiseptics that could help bats fight off the fungal disease which killed more than a million of them throughout the United States, according to a weekend report from the Associated Press (AP). The disease, which has infected bats from New York to Tennessee to Oklahoma, is known as white-nose syndrome, AP Medical Writer Marilynn Marchione reported on Sunday. According to Jeremy Coleman of the U.S....

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2010-08-06 06:30:00

One of North America's most common bat species faces extinction in the northeastern U.S. within the next two decades due to a rapidly spreading disease known as White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), according to a new study led by researchers at the Boston University College of Arts & Sciences. The threatened bats, known as little brown myotis, are critical in controlling insects that spread disease to humans and animals.  The bats have been known to consume their own weight in insects in a...

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2009-06-05 14:10:00

Experts warned Congress on Thursday that a mysterious fungus attacking America's bats represents the most serious threat to wildlife in a century and could spread nationwide within years. The condition, known as white-nose syndrome, gets its name from the white fungus speckled amongst the bats, reports the Associated Press. Experts told two House subcommittees on Thursday about discovering caves where bats had been decimated by the disease. "One cave there was turned into a morgue, with bats...

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2009-05-02 11:20:00

A fungus, which has reportedly already killed an estimated 500,000 bats, is causing the U.S. Forest Service to close thousands of caves and former mines in national forests in 33 states in an attempt to control the problem. The problem was first noticed in New York and after two years had spread to caves in both Virginia and West Virginia. 99% of the bats infected have died. While there is no reason to believe the fungus poses a threat to humans, bats have been dying at a startling rate from...

2009-03-29 15:26:34

Scientists say they are racing to discover what it is causing a massive die-off of bats in Connecticut before the condition spreads to the U.S. South. As many as 90 percent of Connecticut's bats have died during winter hibernation after being infected by a rare fungus usually only found in Arctic tundra regions, and scientists are working to find a cause before the white-nose syndrome is spread to the large bat populations of the U.S. South, The Hartford (Conn.) Courant reported Sunday. The...

2009-03-02 14:58:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., March 2 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As Pennsylvania Game Commission wildlife biologists continue to monitor bat hibernacula, the number of sites where bats have been confirmed infected or dying from White Nose Syndrome (WNS) has risen to six. The sites are two abandoned mines near Carbondale, Lackawanna County; an abandoned mine near Shickshinny, Luzerne County; and the abandoned Shindle Iron Mine, Aitkin Cave and Seawra Cave in Mifflin County. "We continue to receive...


Latest Speleology Reference Libraries

European Free-tailed Bat, Tadarida teniotis or Tadarida insignis
2013-06-18 12:46:10

The European free-tailed bat (Tadarida teniotis or Tadarida insignis) is a species of free-tailed bat that is native to many areas in the Old World. It was reportedly seen in Korea in 1931, but no other reports have been recorded since that year. The body length of this species reaches between 3.3 inches and 3.7 inches, with a wing length of up to 2.5 inches. The European free-tailed bat appears on the IUCN Red List with a conservation status of “Least Concern.” Image Caption: European...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.