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Latest Speleothems Stories

2009-11-10 15:35:08

California experienced centuries-long droughts in the past 20,000 years that coincided with the thawing of ice caps in the Arctic, according to a new study by UC Davis doctoral student Jessica Oster and geology professor Isabel Montañez. The finding, which comes from analyzing stalagmites from Moaning Cavern in the central Sierra Nevada, was published online Nov. 5 in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters. The sometimes spectacular mineral formations in caves...

2008-12-06 00:00:00

Geologists say a discovery in a cave near Jerusalem suggests climate change may have caused the fall of the Roman and Byzantine Empires. Geochemical analysis of a stalagmite from Soreq Cave in the Stalactite Cave Nature Reserve reveals increasingly dry weather from A.D. 100 to A.D. 700 that coincided with the fall of both Roman and Byzantine rule in the region, the University of Wisconsin-Madison said Friday. Geology graduate student Ian Orland said oxygen isotope signatures and impurities...

2008-08-19 12:15:00

A stalagmite discovered in a U.S. cave has yielded detailed geological data on 7,000 years of eastern North America climate cycles. The Ohio University-led study confirms that during periods when the Earth received less solar radiation a series of century-long droughts occurred. Researchers led by Assistant Professor Gregory Springer said the stalagmite preserved climate conditions over periods as brief as a few years. The scientists said they found evidence of at least seven major droughts...

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2005-06-01 06:28:36

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- A calcite formation named Snowy River could prove a gold mine for scientists. Snowy River, believed to be the largest continuous calcite formation in the world, was discovered in September 2001 by a Bureau of Land Management team led by veteran speleologist John McLean of Colorado. The stark white passage, looking like a river of snow surrounded by walls of brown clay and black manganese dioxide deposits, stretches more than two miles from Fort Stanton Cave in...


Latest Speleothems Reference Libraries

Wind Cave National Park
2013-04-18 00:45:24

Wind Cave National Park is located in South Dakota in the United States, only ten miles away from the town of Hot Springs. The park holds 33,847 acres of cave system, and was the first national park of its kind. European explorers and Native Americans that traveled through the area knew that the cave was there, but there has been no existence of habitation found within the cave. Although the Lakota people spoke of a scared cave that produced wind, the first recorded discovery of the cave...

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