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Latest Sperm competition Stories

2014-07-29 23:02:29

In a new study, researchers mated worms of different species and found that the females’ lifespans and number of offspring were drastically reduced compared with females mated with the same species, and cross-species-mated females were often sterile. The researchers showed that the “foreign” sperm had broken from the female’s uterus, prematurely fertilized the eggs and destroyed the ovaries (causing no viable offspring and sterility), and traveled throughout the worm’s body...

Study Shows Impact Of Polyandry On Reproductive Success In Fire Salamanders
2013-12-02 16:11:27

University of Bielefeld Researchers at Bielefeld University and the Technische Universität Braunschweig are the first to confirm the benefit of multiple paternities for a vertebrate under completely natural conditions. Together with their team, Dr. Barbara Caspers and Dr. Sebastian Steinfartz have shown that female fire salamanders mate with several males under natural conditions (so-called polyandry). This grants them fitness-relevant benefits by increasing their number of offspring. The...

Role Of Sperm Competition In Formation Of New Species Confirmed By Biologists
2013-09-27 08:09:16

Syracuse University 'Current Biology' article marks culmination of 6 years of research Female promiscuity—something that occurs in a majority of species, including humans—results in the ejaculates from two or more males overlapping within her reproductive tract. When this happens, sperm compete for fertilization of the female's eggs. In addition, the female has the opportunity to bias fertilization of her eggs in favor of one male's sperm over others. These processes,...

2013-06-11 11:12:09

Females play a larger role in determining paternity than previously thought, say biologists in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences. Their findings are the subject of a new paper titled "Female mediation of competitive fertilization success in Drosophila melanogaster," published this month by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Stefan Lüpold, a research assistant professor in the college's Department of Biology and...

2012-05-03 19:27:21

Insect glands are responsible for producing a host of secretions that allow bees to sting and ants to lay down trails to and from their nests. New research from Carnegie scientists focuses on secretions from glands in the reproductive tract that help sperm survive and guide the sperm on the trip to fertilize an egg. The gene that controls the development of these glands in fruit flies provides important information about gland development in all insects, as well as potential clues to similar...

2012-05-03 18:49:35

At one University of Cincinnati laboratory, the phrase “battle of the sexes” is taking on new meaning, with implications for our understanding of evolution. In a paper published Thursday, May 3, in the journal Evolution, University of Cincinnati graduate student Karl Grieshop and Michal Polak, associate professor of biological sciences at UC, examine the role of genital spines in the reproductive success of a species of fruit fly. Their investigation identifies the specific...

2012-01-30 09:15:58

A new study shows the production of sperm is more biologically taxing than previously thought, and expending energy on it has significant health implications. In research published in PLoS ONE, Dr Damian Dowling of Monash University's School of Biological Sciences and Professor Leigh Simmons of the University of Western Australia have investigated the trade-off between sperm quality and immunity. The researchers used the Australian cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus to prove that the...

2011-08-08 12:11:31

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that male fruitflies experience a type of 'paranoia' in the presence of another male, which doubles the length of time they mate with a female, despite the female of the species only ever mating with one male. Females in many species of animal have multiple mates and males have evolved particular reproductive characteristics to ensure their sperm are successful when in competition with the sperm of other males. Adaptations include physical...

2010-12-23 17:31:03

When prowling for a hook up, it's not always the good-looker who gets the girl. In fact, in a certain species of South American fish, brawn and stealth beat out colorful and refined almost every time. In a series of published studies of a South American species of fish (Poecilia parae), which are closely related to guppies, Syracuse University scientists have discovered how the interplay between male mating strategies and predator behavior has helped preserve the population's distinctive...

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2010-11-10 08:50:00

British university scientists have discovered a species of bushcricket that boasts the largest testicles in the animal kingdom, representing 14 percent of their total body weight, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Biology Letters. In the study, biologists at the University of Derby and the University of Cambridge noted that the sizable testes of the Tuberous Bushcricket (Platycleis affinis)--the largest in relation to body weight in the world--point towards rampant...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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