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Latest Spices Stories

Russian Researchers Claim They’ve Regenerated 32,000 Year-Old Plant
2012-02-22 05:43:22

According to a recent report in the New York Times, Russian scientists have successfully generating a living plant (Silene stenophylla) from the fruit of a species that went extinct in the last ice age some 32,000 years ago.

2012-02-21 21:35:00

Recently featured on a popular TV show, non-GMO Satiereal® Saffron Extract is an appetite control ingredient that can help reduce emotional eating.

2012-02-10 08:00:00

Zion Health's Feet Treat Xtreme; Contains a high concentration of Cinnamon well known for its natural anti- bacterial properties formulated to soften corns and calluses.- Now available at

2012-01-28 08:00:00

Soon to be released "Mustard Seeds, Shovels and Mountains: Achieve Success Using Your Physio-Psychic Power" teaches the truth about success ...

2012-01-17 08:00:00

Satisfy the licorice craving with the sweet-bitter scent of Licorice Soap from Henley Natural.

2011-12-04 08:00:00

As reported by Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, a new study has found that a component of garlic oil may help release protective compounds to the heart after a heart attack, during cardiac surgery,


Latest Spices Reference Libraries

Black Pepper, Piper nigrum
2014-02-15 08:34:58

Piper nigrum is a flowering vine species. The plant may also be commonly referred to as Black Pepper. The species belongs to the Piperaceae family. It is indigenous to south India; however the plant is widely cultivated worldwide. The fruit, often referred to as its drupe, is sought after and dried. The spice or seasoning is used as the common, table black pepper. To date, Vietnam produces the largest amount of pepper, exporting 34% of the entire world’s pepper supply. P. nigrum may be...

Selasian wood, Cinnamomum parthenoxylon
2014-02-10 07:32:18

Cinnamomum parthenoxylon is an evergreen tree species. The species may also be commonly referred to as Selasian Wood, Saffrol Laurel or Martaban Camphor Wood. The plant is a member of the Lauraceae family. It is indigenous to south and eastern Asia, specifically, Bhutan, Burma, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. Cinnamomum parthenoxylon trees grow anywhere between 33 and 66 feet tall. Its trunk and branches are covered by a grey or...

Camphorwood, Cinnamomum oliveri
2014-02-10 07:20:22

Cinnamomum oliveri is a tree species commonly growing in rainforest habitats. The species can be found along the areas of Australia’s eastern coast, specifically from coastal New South Wales to the northern tip, Cape York Peninsula and down south in the rainforest behind Seven Mile Beach. It prefers warm, temperate areas and grows best in sedimentary soils. C. oliveri belongs to the Lauraceae family and the plant is often commonly referred to as the Camphorwood, Oliver’s Sassafras,...

Chinese cinnamon
2014-02-10 07:07:51

Cinnamomum cassia is an evergreen tree species. The species may also be commonly referred to as the Chinese cassia or Chinese cinnamon. C. cassia is a member of the family Lauraceae. It is indigenous to southern China; however the plant is widely cultivated for its aromatic bark that is turned into the common spice “cinnamon”. The plant is nurtured and grown most abundant in Asia, specifically in India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. Cinnamomum cassia plants...

Sri Lanka cinnamon, Cinnamomum verum
2014-02-09 09:22:38

Cinnamomum verum is an evergreen tree species. The plant may also be commonly referred to as True cinnamon, Ceylon cinnamon, or Sri Lanka cinnamon. C. verum belongs to the Lauraceae family. This small tree is popular because its inner bark is used to make the common spice cinnamon.  A large majority of plants grow in Sri Lanka; however it is cultivated for commercial purposes in other regions. C. verum trees can grow anywhere between 32 and 50 feet tall. Its leaves are longer than they...

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Word of the Day
plim
  • To swell, as grain or wood with water.
The word 'plim' is probably a variant of the word 'plum'.
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