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Latest Spider Stories

Male Spiders Eavesdrop To One-Up Their Rivals
2012-01-04 11:18:01

[ Watch the Video ] Just published this month, new research shows how spiders eavesdrop on other males and copy their courtship signals as a likely means of stealing their mate. Researchers have made a new discovery into the complex world of spiders that reflects what some might perceive as similar behavior in human society. As male wolf spiders go searching for a mate, it appears they eavesdrop, match and even try to outdo the mating dances of their successful rivals, a behavior seen...

Super Silk From Genetically Modified Silk Worms
2012-01-04 08:13:26

US researchers say they have created genetically modified (GM) silkworms that spin silk far stronger and more elastic than the normal silk produced by the critter. Scientists from University of Wyoming, who published their research in the PNAS journal, say their ultimate goal is to produce silk from worms that has the toughness of spider silk. Spider silk, weight-for-weight, is stronger than steel. The team say the silkworm silk has a whole range of biomedical applications, including uses...

2011-12-13 01:06:50

If you're a red-headed guy with eight bulging eyes and a unibrow, size does indeed matter for getting the girl. More specifically, the bigger a male jumping spider's weapons appear to be, the more likely his rival will slink away without a fight, leaving the bigger guy a clear path to the waiting female. Duke University graduate student Cynthia Tedore, working with her dissertation advisor, visual ecologist Sönke Johnsen, wanted to know what visual signals matter most to...

2011-12-12 22:07:09

Smithsonian researchers report that the brains of tiny spiders are so large that they fill their body cavities and overflow into their legs. As part of ongoing research to understand how miniaturization affects brain size and behavior, researchers measured the central nervous systems of nine species of spiders, from rainforest giants to spiders smaller than the head of a pin. As the spiders get smaller, their brains get proportionally bigger, filling up more and more of their body cavities....

Image 1 - Researchers Reveal Spider Mite's Secrets
2011-11-24 04:48:50

Blueprint of spider mite may yield better pesticides A University of Utah biologist and an international research team decoded the genetic blueprint of the two-spotted spider mite, raising hope for new ways to attack the major pest, which resists pesticides and destroys crops and ornamental plants worldwide. The voracious mites, which technically are not insects, can eat more than 1,100 plant species — a rare trait. The mites' newly revealed and sequenced genome contains a variety...

2011-11-23 11:47:31

Researchers have shown for the first time how Golden orb web spiders (Nephila antipodiana) add a chemical to their web silk to repel invading ants. The finding adds a chemical defense to the impressive properties of spider silk, already known to be very strong, elastic and adhesive, and may provide new opportunities for pesticide design. The study was led by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the University of Melbourne, and is published in the journal...

Deceitful Spider Pays For Sex And Plays Dead
2011-11-14 05:26:11

Male nursery web spiders (Pisaura mirabilis) prepare silk-wrapped gifts to give to potential mates. Most gifts contain insects, but some gifts are inedible plant seeds or empty exoskeletons left after the prey has already been eaten (presumably by the male himself!). Males will also 'play dead' if a female moves away and then attempt to re-establish mating. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology examines the reproductive success of deceitful...

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2011-08-18 10:08:50

"The strength of spider dragline silk exceeds that of any material produced in laboratories, by far. All attempts to manufacture threads of similar strength have failed thus far," explains Professor Horst Kessler, Carl von Linde Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at the TU Muenchen (TUM-IAS). In collaboration with the workgroup of Prof. Thomas Scheibel, who was a researcher at the TU Muenchen until 2007 and who now holds a chair of the Institute of Biomaterials at the Universitaet...

2011-07-06 06:19:04

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Young house spiders weave webs with perfect angles and regular patterns, but as they reach old age their webs deteriorate, showing gaping holes and erratic weaving. By using spiders as a simple model this research may provide insight into how age affects behavior in other organisms, including humans. The reason web building skills are lost as spiders grow older may be due to degeneration of the central nervous system. PhD researcher, Mylne Anotaux, from Nancy University...


Latest Spider Reference Libraries

Singapore Blue, Lampropelma violaceopes
2014-09-22 17:06:17

The Singapore Blue (Lampropelma violaceopes) is a large tree-dwelling species of tarantula from Malaysia and Singapore. These spiders have been known to grow in excess of nine inches across. The body is a very colorful blue with brown or gold colored carapace. The male equivalent is normally not as vibrant. The diet is made up primarily of beetles, cockroaches, crickets, pinky mice, birds, and other small animals. During feeding, the abdomen will often increase in size two-fold. Image...

Western Desert Tarantula, Aphonopelma chalcodes
2014-09-22 16:18:33

The Western Desert Tarantula (Aphonopelma chalcodes), known also as the Arizona Blond Tarantula or the Mexican Blond Tarantula, is a species of spider belonging to the family Theraphosidae. It has a limited distribution within the deserts of Arizona and adjacent parts of Mexico but can be very common within this range. The common name “blond tarantula” is in reference to the carapace, which is densely covered in pale hairs and contrasts strongly with the all-dark colored legs and abdomen....

Texas Brown Tarantula, Aphonopelma hentzi
2014-09-22 16:02:39

The Texas Brown Tarantula (Aphonopelma hentzi), known also as the Oklahoma Brown Tarantula or the Missouri Tarantula, is one of the most common species of tarantula thriving in the southern-most United States today. Texas Browns can grow to be over four inches in legspan, and weigh more than three ounces as adults. The body is a dark brown color. The shades may vary between individual tarantulas and is more distinct after moult. Female individuals can lay up to 1,000 eggs. The eggs are...

Mexican Golden Red Rump Tarantula, Brachypelma albiceps
2014-09-21 10:05:15

Mexican Golden Red Rump Tarantula (Brachypelma albiceps) is a species of the genus Brachypelma. The carapace is a light golden color with legs and a black abdomen covered with longer red hairs. Females typically live for about fifteen years. The males normally live about five years or up to twelve months after the last molt. This spider is native to the central highlands of Mexico, especially in Guerrero and south of Morelos. In the wild, they construct underground burrows, typically under...

Honduran Curlyhair, Brachypelma albopilosum
2014-09-21 09:46:39

The Honduran Curlyhair (Brachypelma albopilosum) is a species of tarantula that have a native range including Central America, from Honduras to Costa Rica. They are terrestrial and opportunistic burrowing spiders. It is covered in long hairs that have a characteristic curl to them giving it a unique look. This tarantula is a plump-bodied spider covered with dark brown to black colored hair. It has a golden-bronze sheen because of the longer gold hairs that cover the whole body, which are...

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Word of the Day
bellycheer
  • Good cheer; viands.
  • To revel; to feast.
The word 'bellycheer' may come from 'belle cheer', "good cheer".
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