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2010-12-17 09:38:03

Physicists read data after storing them in atomic nuclei for 112 seconds University of Utah physicists stored information for 112 seconds in what may become the world's tiniest computer memory: magnetic "spins" in the centers or nuclei of atoms. Then the physicists retrieved and read the data electronically "“ a big step toward using the new kind of memory for both faster conventional and superfast "quantum" computers. "The length of spin memory we observed is more than adequate to...

2010-12-08 22:05:26

Researchers from Queen Mary, University of London (UK) and the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) have shown that a magnetically polarised current can be manipulated by electric fields. Published this week in the journal Nature Materials, this important discovery opens up the prospect of simultaneously processing and storing data on electrons held in the molecular structure of computer chips - combining computer memory and processing power on the same chip. "This is especially exciting, as...

2010-09-27 17:41:39

At the Large Hadron Collider at CERN protons crash into each other at incredibly high energies in order to 'smash' the protons and to study the elementary particles of nature "“ including quarks. Quarks are found in each proton and are bound together by forces which cause all other known forces of nature to fade. To understand the effects of these strong forces between the quarks is one of the greatest challenges in modern particle physics. New theoretical results from the Niels Bohr...

2010-09-17 14:03:55

Team successfully decoupled a single quantum spin from its surroundings Finding ways to control matter at the level of single atoms and electrons fascinates many scientists and engineers because the ability to manipulate single charges and single magnetic moments (spins) may help researchers penetrate deep into the mysteries of quantum mechanics and modern solid-state physics. It may also allow development of new, highly sensitive magnetometers with nanometer resolution, single-spin...

2010-09-15 17:29:25

The PhD thesis by Carlos Echeverría Arrondo, Doctor in Physics from the Public University of Navarre and entitled "On doped semiconductor quantum dots and magnetic nanowires", studied the behaviour and properties of nanometric-scale semiconductor crystals. The interest aroused by nanoscience and nanotechnology spurred Dr Echeverría to study the behaviour of semiconductor crystals when their size is reduced to less than one hundred nanometres (a nanometre is...

2010-08-26 22:39:02

The integration of single-spin magnetoelectronics into standard silicon technology may soon be possible, if experiments confirm a new theoretical prediction by physicists at the Naval Research Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The researchers predict that a family of well-known silicon surfaces, stabilized by small amounts of gold atoms, is intrinsically magnetic despite having no magnetic elements. None of these surfaces has yet been investigated experimentally for...

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2010-08-25 09:11:20

Using powerful lasers, Hui Zhao, assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Kansas, and graduate student Lalani Werake have discovered a new way to recognize currents of spinning electrons within a semiconductor. Their findings could lead the way to development of superior computers and electronics. Results from their work in KU's Ultrafast Laser Lab will be published in the September issue of Nature Physics, a leading peer-reviewed journal, and was posted online in...

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2010-08-17 16:03:49

Breakthrough paves way to store and process information in novel spin-electronics Processing large amounts of information in today's electronics requires large amounts of power, which results in heating. Heat can ruin modern electronics by potentially damaging the stuff that makes them work--the ever smaller and denser structures in a computer's "brain," the microprocessor that incorporates all of its logic functions. So, researchers have been investigating something called "spintronics," a...

2010-06-27 13:23:07

The best theory for explaining the subatomic world got its start in 1928 when theorist Paul Dirac combined quantum mechanics with special relativity to explain the behavior of the electron. The result was relativistic quantum mechanics, which became a major ingredient in quantum field theory. With a few assumptions and ad hoc adjustments, quantum field theory has proven powerful enough to form the basis of the Standard Model of particles and forces. "Even so, it should be remembered that the...

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2010-06-25 10:16:06

Experiment tests underpinnings of quantum field theory, Bose-Einstein statistics of photons Of all the assumptions underlying quantum mechanics and the theory that describes how particles interact at the most elementary level, perhaps the most basic is that particles are either bosons or fermions. Bosons, such as the particles of light called photons, play by one set of rules; fermions, including electrons, play by another. Seven years ago, University of California, Berkeley, physicists asked...


Latest Spin Reference Libraries

24_1c0ab0c13e5087199db0f92d17627518
2010-09-27 17:20:27

A gyroscope uses the principles of conservation and angular momentum to measure and maintain orientation. The mechanical gyroscope is a spinning wheel or disk whose axle is free to take any orientation. The gyroscope's high rate of spin allows for large angular momentum which makes the orientation changes much more responsive to a given external torque. There is also the electronic, microchip-packaged MEMS gyroscope, solid state ring laser and fiber optic gyroscope, as well as the extremely...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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