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Latest Spinach Stories

2008-06-21 03:00:00

The Ohio Department of Health and officials in five Ohio counties are investigating 17 illnesses from E. coli bacteria. So far the cases are confined to counties in Central and Northwest Ohio. Thirteen of the 17 cases have been linked by genetic fingerprinting and also match the genetic fingerprint of several cases in Michigan, according to the state health department. The strain is E. coli O157:H7, the same type that caused a national outbreak from spinach in 2006. So far, no source for...

2008-06-20 06:00:00

By Misti Crane, The Columbus Dispatch, Ohio Jun. 20--The central Ohio E. coli outbreak is growing and has reached northwestern Ohio and Michigan. The number of cases within central Ohio hit 14 and eight of them have been linked genetically, meaning they are likely from the same source, health officials said yesterday. Two more Ohio cases -- one each in Lucas and Seneca counties -- also match the eight that have been linked here, said Ohio Department of Health spokesman Kristopher Weiss....

2008-06-18 09:00:04

CHICAGO _ David Acheson is the nation's top food detective, but so far he has met his match in the wily tomato. With the salmonella scare that has plagued tomatoes, Acheson has faced perhaps his biggest test _ at least as far as outbreaks of illness go _ since he assumed the newly created "food safety czar" post at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration roughly a year ago. That position was born amid a growing concern the FDA couldn't get a grip on food safety, as tales of foodborne...

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2008-06-18 06:05:00

The contamination of tomatoes with a rare strain of salmonella has led to the largest outbreak of food-borne illnesses since E. coli in spinach killed five and sickened hundreds almost two years ago. At least 277 people of all ages in 28 states and the District of Columbia have been sickened; 43 have been hospitalized. A nationwide recall of round, plum and Roma tomatoes has dealt a sharp blow to the $2.7 billion fresh-tomato market, costing the food industry tens of millions of dollars....

2008-06-17 03:00:03

TOMATOES are the new spinach. They're this year's peanut butter and imported seafood, the latest in a painfully long line of potentially tainted foods to turn up on market shelves. By now, it should be painfully obvious to consumers, grocers and farmers that the nation's food safety system is in urgent need of retooling. It is fragmented, underfunded and lacks such common sense tools as the ability to track products and order recalls. On Thursday, congressional investigators were expected...

2008-06-17 00:00:23

By Lauran Neergaard The Associated Press WASHINGTON - Food and Drug Administration detectives had a hot lead, narrowing down to a grower who just might have supplied salmonella-tainted tomatoes. Then the patient changed her story: She'd eaten a round tomato, not a Roma one after all. "We basically had to throw it all out and start over," says Dr. David Acheson, the agency's food safety chief. Why is it taking so long to find the source of those bad tomatoes? It largely boils down to...

2008-06-16 15:00:00

Jackie Phillips scanned a sea of bright red tomatoes in a Whitefish Bay food store Friday and wondered aloud whether it was safe to buy any of them. "I've tried to watch and see what's safe and what's not, but it's hard to keep track," said Phillips, 25. "Produce in general makes you nervous -- between spinach and tomatoes. . . . We need better controls." Phillips, of Whitefish Bay, is not the only shopper experiencing tomato anxiety as the federal government works to track down the source...

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2008-06-15 12:10:00

Food and Drug Administration detectives had a hot lead, narrowing down on a grower who just might have supplied salmonella-tainted tomatoes. Then the patient changed her story: She'd eaten a round tomato, not a Roma one after all. "We basically had to throw it all out and start over," says Dr. David Acheson, the agency's food safety chief. Why is it taking so long to find the source of those bad tomatoes? It largely boils down to the frailty of human memory and the mysteries of the tomato...

2008-06-14 06:00:02

By Elaine Walker, The Miami Herald Jun. 14--As Sylena Reid picked up a tomato at Publix, she paused before she put it into her shopping basket. "I hope they're safe now," said Reid, 30, of Hollywood. "I can't make bruschetta without tomatoes." After a national salmonella outbreak had knocked three popular tomato varieties off grocery shelves and restaurant menus for several days, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared Florida tomatoes on Tuesday. Publix, Winn-Dixie, Burger King...

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2008-04-10 09:40:00

Washing fresh fruits and vegetables before eating may reduce the risk of food poisoning and those awful episodes of vomiting and diarrhea. But according to new research, described today at the 235th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, washing alone "” even with chlorine disinfectants "” may not be enough. Studies show that certain disease-causing microbes are masters at playing hide-and-go seek with such chemical sanitizers. These bacteria can make their way inside...


Latest Spinach Reference Libraries

Leaf vegetables
2013-08-21 09:03:22

Leaf vegetables are leaves from various plants that are edible with some leaves having tender shoots, such as beet greens, attached. Leaf vegetables are very high in nutrition and may be used in various culinary dishes. While there are over a thousand species of leaf vegetables, they generally come from plants that are short-lived such as lettuce and spinach. Leaf vegetables are high in vitamin K which is caused from the photosynthesis that takes place during the growing phase. Anyone on...

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