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Latest Spliceosome Stories

2010-01-04 14:33:28

A team of researchers is being recognized for devising a new way to study a human protein that long has evaded close scrutiny by scientists investigating its role in the communication of important genetic messages inside a cell's nucleus to workhorse molecules found elsewhere. Last year, the team, led by J. Andrew Hockert, at the time a doctoral researcher at the Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine, put in its crosshairs the protein known as CstF-64. Today, in what...

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2009-12-15 08:25:00

TAU researchers unravel the mysteries of DNA packaging Imagine a huge spool of film containing thousands of sequences of random scenes. Without a talented editor, a screening would have no meaning. The RNA "spools" that make up DNA in our genes need careful editing, too. Genes are composed of meaningful sequences, called exons, separated by meaningless junk sections called introns. In order for cells to produce RNA "” the material that is required to create proteins that are vital for...

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2009-12-10 12:48:52

The sequences of nonsense DNA that interrupt genes could be far more important to the evolution of genomes than previously thought, according to a recent Science report by Indiana University Bloomington and University of New Hampshire biologists. Their study of the model organism Daphnia pulex (water flea) is the first to demonstrate the colonization of a single lineage by "introns," as the interrupting sequences are known. The scientists say introns are inserted into the genome far more...

2009-12-07 20:02:13

University of Georgia scientists looking to understand the genetic mechanisms of plant defense and growth have found for the first time in plants an inverse relationship between gene duplication and alternative splicing. The finding has implications for diversity not only in plants, but in animals and humans. The research will be published online in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "This inverse relationship has been previously reported in animals," said University...

2009-12-04 14:17:53

Humans and mice have previously unknown and potentially critical differences in one of the genes responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Biology have found that two major features of a key DMD gene are present in most mammals, including humans, but are specifically absent in mice and rats, calling into question the use of the mouse as the principal model animal for studying DMD. Roland Roberts led a team of researchers from King\'s...

2009-11-18 00:00:00

AMSTERDAM, November 18 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- - Glybera(R) Clinical Data Presented at Meeting of American Heart Association Amsterdam Molecular Therapeutics (EuroNext Amsterdam: AMT), a leader in the field of human gene therapy, today provides its non-audited business update in compliance with the EU transparency directive. This report summarizes material events and AMT's financial position for the third quarter of 2009. Q3 2009 Highlights - Jorn Aldag joins AMT as...

2009-11-11 00:00:00

AMSTERDAM, November 11 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Amsterdam Molecular Therapeutics (Euronext: AMT), a leader in the field of human gene therapy, announced today that it has successfully treated Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in an animal model with its proprietary gene therapy. The proof of concept studies were performed in collaboration with the group of Professor Irene Bozzoni (University of Rome, La Sapienza, Italy) and demonstrated effectiveness in the heart as well as in skeletal...

2009-11-06 09:32:00

Dr. Carmen Bertoni to Receive $75,000 For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research MIDDLETOWN, Ohio, Nov. 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Patricia A. Furlong, Founding President and CEO of Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD), the largest non-profit organization in the United States focused on finding a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Duchenne), announced today the latest recipient of the End Duchenne Grant Award Program. Carmen Bertoni, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of the Department...

2009-11-04 15:00:26

A chemical cousin of the common antibiotic tetracycline might be useful in treating spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a currently incurable disease that is the leading genetic cause of death in infants. This is the finding of a research collaboration involving Adrian Krainer, Ph.D., of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and scientists from Paratek Pharmaceuticals and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. SMA is caused by mutations in a gene called Survival of Motor Neuron 1...

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2009-11-03 06:50:00

Pateamine A (PatA), a natural product first isolated from marine sponges, has attracted considerable attention as a potential anti-cancer agent, and now a new activity has been found for it, which may reveal yet another anti-cancer mechanism. That's the assessment of Daniel Romo, a Texas A&M chemistry professor, and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins University who are pioneers in research involving this novel marine natural product. Messenger RNA (mRNA), as its name indicates, copies...