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2011-04-04 11:04:00

Grant Funds Work of Ronald G. Victor, M.D. and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center HACKENSACK, N.J., April 4, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) - the largest, most comprehensive non-profit organization in the United States focused on finding a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) - announced today that they will award Ronald G. Victor, M.D. of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, a $750,000 grant to fund his study of phosphodiesterase inhibitors...

2011-03-18 11:22:00

Zebrafish study highlights existing drugs that may help restore muscle in DMD BOSTON, March 18, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Armed with a zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and a library of 1,200 chemicals already approved for human use, researchers at Children's Hospital Boston have identified a compound that reverses the loss of muscle structure and function associated with DMD, seemingly by compensating for the loss of a critical protein. The discovery, published...

2011-03-10 23:36:25

Lasers used to study splicing of pre-messenger RNA molecules From neurosurgery to bar code readers, lasers have been used in a myriad of applications since they were first introduced in the late 1950's. Now, with the work being done in Jeff Gelles' Lab at Brandeis University, researchers have developed a way to use lasers to study the splicing of pre-messenger RNA molecules, an essential process in creating proteins to sustain advanced organisms, including human life. This process of splicing...

2011-03-09 16:02:28

Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania explain how a class of RNA molecules is able to target the genetic building blocks that guide the functioning of a specific part of the nerve cell. Abnormalities at this site are in involved in epilepsy, neurodegenerative disease, and cognitive disorders. Their results are published this week in the journal Neuron. A team of researchers, led by James Eberwine, PhD, the Elmer Bobst Professor of Pharmacology in the School of Medicine, and Junhyong...

2011-03-06 23:59:00

AMSTERDAM, March 7, 2011 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Amsterdam Molecular Therapeutics (AMT) (Euronext: AMT), a leader in the field of human gene therapy, announced today that the Duchenne Parent Project, based in the Netherlands, has awarded AMT a grant of EUR 145,000 to support the development of AMT-080, AMT's gene therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). DMD is a severe, fatal disease affecting young children, almost exclusively boys, characterized by progressive muscle...

2011-02-08 10:14:00

Efforts over decade result in $192 million in Duchenne-specific federal investment HACKENSACK, N.J., Feb. 8, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) - the largest non-profit organization in the United States focused on finding a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) - will host their annual Advocacy Conference, including the One Voice Advocacy Summit, in Washington, D.C. from February 13 - 15, 2011. (Logo:...

2011-02-04 12:48:21

It's a gene called DOT1L, and if you don't have enough of the DOT1L enzyme, you could be at risk for some types of heart disease. These findings by UNC researchers appear in the Feb. 1, 2011 issue of the journal Genes and Development. Everyone knows chocolate is critical to a happy Valentine's Day. Now scientists are one step closer to knowing what makes a heart happy the rest of the year. It's a gene called DOT1L, and if you don't have enough of the DOT1L enzyme, you could be at risk for...

2011-01-31 13:37:28

DNA was originally thought to have a single function:  to help cells make the proteins they need.  Any DNA that is not immediately required to produce proteins was written off as "junk" and deemed unworthy of study.  Recently, however, it has become clear that junk DNA performs a wide range of important tasks.  As a result, attention is shifting to asking why some organisms have so much of it and other organisms so little.  A particular puzzle is posed by so-called...

2011-01-19 23:20:54

Scientists are reporting an advance in overcoming a major barrier to the use of the genetic material RNA in nanotechnology "” the field that involves building machines thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair and now is dominated by its cousin, DNA. Their findings, which could speed the use of RNA nanotechnology for treating disease, appear in the monthly journal ACS Nano. Peixuan Guo and colleagues point out that DNA, the double-stranded genetic blueprint of life, and...

2010-12-27 20:41:24

A novel potential therapy based on a natural human protein significantly slows muscle damage and improves function in mice who have the same genetic mutation as boys with the most common form of muscular dystrophy, according to a paper published online Dec. 27 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a fatal genetic mutation in about one of every 3,500 boys. They are unable to produce a protein called dystrophin that keeps muscles strong. By eight...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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