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Latest Spotfin croaker Stories

2008-10-02 03:00:25

By Pondella, Daniel J II Froeschke, John T; Wetmore, Lynne S; Miller, Eric; Valle, Charles F; Medeiros, Lea Abstract: The yellowfin croaker, Umbrina roncador Jordan & Gilbert, 1882, is a common nearshore and surf-zone species in the southern California bight. Age was determined for individuals (n = 1,209) using annual increments in otoliths, and size at age was modeled using the von Bertalanffy growth curve (L^sub [infinity]^ = 307.754 mm, k = 0.278 yr^sup -1^, t^sub 0^ = -0.995 yr;...


Latest Spotfin croaker Reference Libraries

Yellowfin croaker (Umbrina roncador)
2014-01-08 15:05:32

The yellowfin croaker can be found in the Gulf of California and Mexico. It is commonly found in bays, channels, harbors, and other near shore waters that have sandy bottoms. It is abundantly found along beaches during the summer and move to deeper waters for the winter. It has an arched back and an elliptical-elongated body with a blunt head. It is iridescent blue-grey in color with brassy reflections on the back with a silvery white belly. There are multiple dark wavy lines along its...

39_cabd8eea36070b00ca5c2cc22c26941b
2007-12-18 14:24:56

The White Croaker (Genyonemus lineatus), is a species of croaker occurring in the Eastern Pacific. White croakers have been found from Magdalena Bay, Baja California, to Vancouver Island, British Columbia, but are not abundant north of San Francisco. The white croaker is the only species of in the genus Genyonemus. Other common names for the fish include Pasadena trout, Tommy croaker, and little bass. The body of the white croaker is elongate and somewhat compressed. The head is oblong...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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