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Latest Spur Stories

2011-11-18 03:43:02

A new study of flower petals shows evolution in action, and contradicts more that 60 years of scientific thought. The findings are reported by a scientist from UC Santa Barbara and a research team from Harvard University in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B this week. Columbine flowers, known as Aquilegia, evolved several lengths of petal spurs that match the tongue lengths of their pollinators, including bees, hummingbirds, and hawkmoths. The petal spurs are shaped like a tubular...

Image 1 - Dramatic Diversity Of Columbine Flowers Explained By Simple Change In Cell Shape
2011-11-16 10:00:49

[ Watch the Video ] To match pollinators' probing tongues, cells in floral spurs elongate, driving rapid speciation Columbine flowers are recognizable by the long, trailing nectar spurs that extend from the bases of their petals, tempting the taste buds of their insect pollinators. New research at Harvard and the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) helps to explain how columbines have achieved a rapid radiation of approximately 70 species, with flowers apparently tailored...

2008-10-08 09:00:29

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Oct. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- The modern American rodeo reaches its pinnacle every year at the National Finals Rodeo (NFR) in Las Vegas. What started out in Dallas in 1958, with a total purse of $50,000 -- has grown into a total payout of more than $5.6 million, an annual 10-day 'world series' class event that packs the 17,000-seat Thomas & Mack Center in Vegas with fans who wouldn't think of being anywhere else on earth. (Logo:...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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