Quantcast

Latest Sputnik program Stories

210d435ee4669342f01f7d6613aa56d31
2008-01-31 07:35:00

Explorer 1 was the first satellite launched by the United States when it was sent into space on January 31, 1958. Following the launch of the Soviet Union's Sputnik 1 on October 4, 1957, the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency was directed to launch a satellite using its Jupiter C rocket developed under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory received the assignment to design, build and operate the artificial satellite that would serve as the rocket's payload....

db8895384a438c861b010658fc06db7f
2007-11-02 18:00:10

By VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV MOSCOW - Just a month after the Soviet Union stunned the world by putting the first artificial satellite into orbit, it boasted a new victory - a much bigger satellite carrying a mongrel dog called Laika. The mission, 50 years ago Saturday, ended sadly for Laika but helped pave the way for human flight. Nowadays Russia launches rats, fish and other small species for experiments. But larger animals like dogs and monkeys are no longer sent into space. As with other...

c61e10128160b15e0d4bb9fd31f332d21
2007-10-10 09:25:00

"Beep"¦ beep"¦ beep...." That's the sound that marked the beginning of the Space Age fifty years ago. It was a simple radio tone transmitted by the first satellite, Sputnik 1, as it orbited Earth in October 1957. Since then communication with spacecraft has advanced tremendously. Yet a modern probe on the way to the edge of the solar system is using Sputnik-like tones to send messages back to Earth. Why the retro technology? It solves a modern problem: multiplication. Sputnik...

18c9c20db61618fc0282593a6d2407591
2007-10-04 06:00:00

By Mike Mullane Tonight, I will sit in my backyard spa and look into the evening twilight and count the passing satellites. In the clear, dry New Mexican sky they're easy to see. Just as the setting sun lingers on the tallest mountain peak, satellites that are hundreds of miles high continue to reflect sunlight long after the Earth beneath them has darkened. Most evenings I'll observe at least a half-dozen of the little "moons," but it wouldn't be remarkable to count 10 or more. As they...

87e1936809d5652b92b3d1a64fedded01
2007-10-02 23:15:00

To say the least, it was incredible. The news relayed by the voice on the other end of the phone line hit the president of the San Gabriel Valley Radio Club like a blow to the head. Too incredible, Henry Richter hoped, to be true. Hope was something Richter knew quite well. It went with the job. Not only as president of a local ham radio club; although you always hoped the guy on the other side of the world talking to you over the shortwave would have something interesting to say. No,...

2006-08-09 15:25:00

CHICAGO (Reuters) - American physicist James Van Allen, who helped propel the United States into the space race and discovered the bands of radiation that surround the Earth that were later named for him, died on Wednesday, the University of Iowa said. Van Allen, a longtime professor at the university, died from undisclosed causes. He was 91. He designed numerous instruments carried aboard U.S. space probes beginning with the instrumentation and Geiger counters aboard Explorer 1. The...


Latest Sputnik program Reference Libraries

2_a30aed7f3edbf4777525bf884960d25d2
2004-10-19 04:45:40

Jodrell Bank Observatory -- The Jodrell Bank Observatory, near Macclesfield, Cheshire in the north west of England is a part of the University of Manchester. It has played an important part in the research into quasars and pulsars, as well as the first detection of a gravitational lens in 1979, confirming one of Einstein's theories. It was established in 1945 by Dr. Bernard Lovell, who wanted to investigate cosmic rays after his work on radar in World War II. The first radio...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.