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Latest squamous cell carcinoma Stories

2011-04-12 15:14:36

Findings might lead to targets for therapy, early detection Squamous cell cancers of the oral cavity and esophagus are common throughout the world, with over 650,000 cases of oral cancer each year and esophageal cancer representing the sixth most common cause of cancer death in men. Research by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine investigators has shown that a protein that helps cells stick together is frequently absent or out of place in these cancers, but it's unclear if its loss...

2011-04-06 07:49:06

By: Rhonda Craig, Ivanhoe Health Correspondent A leukemia drug may be used as a new target therapy for some lung cancer patients. Nearly 150,000 Americans die of lung cancer each year, and squamous cell lung cancers account for at least 30 percent these deaths. Scientists at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified a mutation in the DDR2 gene that may indicate which squamous cell lung cancer patients will respond to the drug dasatinib. The findings were presented at the American...

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2011-04-06 07:45:00

Freeze-dried strawberries may be an alternative to drugs for the prevention of esophageal cancer, according to research presented at the AACR 102nd Annual Meeting 2011. "We concluded from this study that six months of eating strawberries is safe and easy to consume. In addition, our preliminary data suggests that strawberries can decrease histological grade of precancerous lesions and reduce cancer-related molecular events," said lead researcher Tong Chen, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor,...

2011-04-04 19:37:58

Among people with AIDS, the risk of stomach and esophageal malignancies is higher than among the general population, according to study results presented at the AACR 102nd Annual Meeting 2011, held here April 2-6. "People diagnosed with AIDS are living longer due to improved therapies. However, they are at increased risk of developing a number of different cancers, including Kaposi's sarcoma and several lymphomas. The risk of stomach and esophageal cancers in AIDS patients has not previously...

2011-03-16 08:20:01

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Heavy drinking is not associated with one of the two most common types of gullet (oesophageal) cancer, according to this study. Gullet cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide and occurs as one of two main types: squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. But while rates of gullet adenocarcinoma have soared in many Western countries over the past three decades, those of squamous cell carcinoma have been falling. The squamous cell variety is strongly...

2011-03-15 14:34:19

Alcohol intake and risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma: A pooled analysis from the BEACON Consortium Heavy drinking is not associated with one of the two most common types of gullet (oesophageal) cancer, suggests research published online in Gut. Gullet cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide and occurs as one of two main types: squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. But while rates of gullet adenocarcinoma have soared in many Western countries over the past three...

2011-03-08 07:41:28

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ When do organs know to stop growing? The answer could be useful in regenerative medicine, and also in cancer- where there "stop growing" signals either aren't issued or aren't listened to. Researchers have found a regulator of gene activity that tells epidermal stem cells when it's time to grow more skin, as well as a "crowd control" molecule that senses stem cell crowding and turns the growth off. The work, in mice and in human cancer cells, provides clues to new...

2011-03-03 11:00:00

Molecular "switch" turns stem cells on or off; could help burn victims and patients with squamous cell carcinoma BOSTON, March 3, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- How do organs "know" when to stop growing? The answer could be useful in regenerative medicine, and also in cancer - where these "stop growing" signals either aren't issued or aren't heeded. Researchers in the Stem Cell Program at Children's Hospital Boston have now found a regulator of gene activity that tells epidermal stem...

2011-03-02 16:46:43

Melatonin is known to have cancer-protective properties, and shift work can induce desynchrony of the circadian system, reducing melatonin production. Shift work has been thought to have important health impacts, with evidence linking shift work to an increased risk of several cancers including breast, endometrial, prostate, and colorectal, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.  In a recent study, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) found that shift work may be associated with a...

2011-02-27 00:01:40

Tans are caused by harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning lamps, and if you've had one, you've sustained skin cell damage. Middleburg, VA (PRWEB) February 25, 2011 With Spring Break approaching, The Less Cancer Campaign wishes to remind sun worshippers of some of the dangers of tanning. The Skin Cancer Foundation tells us that a tan, whether you get it on the beach, in a bed, or through incidental exposure, is bad news any way you acquire it. Tans are caused by harmful...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.