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Latest squamous cell carcinoma Stories

2011-04-26 11:25:00

BOCA RATON, Fla., April 26, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Premier healthcare alliance, a network of more than 2,500 U.S.

2011-04-19 13:05:09

Squamous cell cancers, which can occur in multiple organs in the body, can originate from hair follicle stem cells, a finding that could result in new strategies to treat and potentially prevent the disease.

2011-04-12 15:14:36

Squamous cell cancers of the oral cavity and esophagus are common throughout the world, with over 650,000 cases of oral cancer each year and esophageal cancer representing the sixth most common cause of cancer death in men.

2011-04-06 07:49:06

A leukemia drug may be used as a new target therapy for some lung cancer patients.

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2011-04-06 07:45:00

Freeze-dried strawberries may be an alternative to drugs for the prevention of esophageal cancer.

2011-04-04 19:37:58

Among people with AIDS, the risk of stomach and esophageal malignancies is higher than among the general population.

2011-03-16 08:20:01

Heavy drinking is not associated with one of the two most common types of gullet (oesophageal) cancer, according to this study.

2011-03-15 14:34:19

Heavy drinking is not associated with one of the two most common types of gullet (oesophageal) cancer, suggests research published online in Gut.

2011-03-08 07:41:28

When do organs know to stop growing? The answer could be useful in regenerative medicine, and also in cancer- where there “stop growing” signals either aren’t issued or aren’t listened to.

2011-03-03 11:00:00

Molecular "switch" turns stem cells on or off; could help burn victims and patients with squamous cell carcinoma BOSTON, March 3, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- How do organs "know" when to stop growing? The answer could be useful in regenerative medicine, and also in cancer - where these "stop growing" signals either aren't issued or aren't heeded.


Word of the Day
meacock
  • An uxorious, effeminate, or spiritless man.
  • A timorous, cowardly fellow.
Probably a blend of meek and cock, or from meek +‎ -ock (“diminutive suffix”).