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Latest SRY Stories

First Sex Determining Genes Appeared In Mammals Some 180 Million Years Ago
2014-04-24 03:55:04

Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics This news release is available in French and German. Man or woman? Male or female? In humans and other mammals, the difference between sexes depends on one single element of the genome: the Y chromosome. It is present only in males, where the two sexual chromosomes are X and Y, whereas women have two X chromosomes. Thus, the Y is ultimately responsible for all the morphological and physiological differences between males and females. But this has not...

Two Y Genes Can Replace Entire Y Chromosome For Assisted Reproduction In Mice
2013-11-21 15:33:20

University of Hawaii at Manoa The Y chromosome is a symbol of maleness, present only in males and encoding genes important for male reproduction. But live mouse offspring can be generated with assisted reproduction using germ cells from males with the Y chromosome contribution limited to only two genes: the testis determinant factor Sry and the spermatogonial proliferation factor Eif2s3y. "Does this mean that the Y chromosome (or most of it) is no longer needed? Yes, given our current...

Genetics Of Male Gender Identity
2013-09-03 12:12:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from scientists at Case Western University indicates that the development of gender in human males is somewhat tenuous and could point to a biological mechanism behind a spectrum of gender identities. In the study, which was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists recruited volunteers from rare families in which a daughter has the same Y chromosome as her father. All fetuses start...

2012-03-08 10:44:37

Authors explore the role of the SRY gene in male fight-or-flight response The pulse quickens, the heart pounds and adrenalin courses through the veins, but in stressful situations is our reaction controlled by our genes, and does it differ between the sexes? Australian scientists, writing in BioEssays, believe the SRY gene, which directs male development, may promote aggression and other traditionally male behavioral traits resulting in the fight-or-flight reaction to stress. Research...

2011-09-27 13:19:22

New research presented today at the European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology meeting has found a genetic region, which may control testicle development in the fetus. Men have XY sex chromosomes, and the development of testes is thought to occur after upregulation of the testicular SOX9 gene pathway, in the presence of factor SRY on the Y chromosome. However, the mechanism by which this testicular SOX9 upregulation occurs has so far been unclear. In this study, Dr Jacqueline Hewitt...

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2010-12-22 13:52:23

University of Adelaide researchers are a step closer to unraveling the mysteries of human sexual development, following genetic studies that show male mice can be created without a Y chromosome "“ through the activation of an ancient brain gene. Males usually have one Y chromosome and one X chromosome, while females have two X chromosomes. A single gene on the Y, called SRY, triggers testes development in the early embryo, and once these begin to form, the rest of the embryo also...

2010-12-02 22:03:12

Gene is linked to so-called 'intersex' families The Y chromosome is supposed to genetically seal a fetus's fate in terms of gender. Males have one X and one Y chromosome, while females have two X chromosomes. Yet, in some families a child is born with an X and Y chromosome and develops physically as a female, although she may not menstruate, and her brothers and male cousins may have underdeveloped or ambiguous genitalia. Now an international team led by Harry Ostrer, MD, director of the...

2010-03-16 16:00:02

Male mice born with female sex chromosomes experience hypertension seen in postmenopausal women Washington, DC "“ Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) have determined that something in female sex chromosomes appears to trigger a rise in blood pressure after the onset of menopause. This finding challenges the current belief that sex hormones are largely responsible for regulating blood pressure. Their work, reported online Monday in Hypertension, is the first of its...

2008-11-13 18:00:07

A gene essential to growth and development of most organ systems is also vital to female, but not male, embryonic sexual development, U.S. researchers say. Researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Texas say the findings lend support to a controversial hypothesis about mammalian sexual development. In terms of their sexual organs, all embryos look alike, study leader Humphrey Yao, of the University of Illinois said. "They have a common primordium, the foundation...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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