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Latest St. Johns River Stories

Florida's Waterways Being Invaded By Pythons, Lionfish And Now Willow Trees
2013-01-08 21:09:24

University of Central Florida Foreign invaders such as pythons and lionfish are not the only threats to Florida's natural habitat. The native Carolina Willow is also starting to strangle portions of the St. Johns River. Biologists at the University of Central Florida recently completed a study that shows this slender tree once used by Native Americans for medicinal purposes, may be thriving because of water-management projects initiated in the 1950s. Canals were built to control runoff...

2010-07-21 08:44:00

PALATKA, Fla., July 21 /PRNewswire/ -- Photographs reflecting the majestic beauty and character of the St. Johns River by 15 photographers have been selected as finalists in a new photo contest to promote the beautiful scenes along the St. Johns River. The pictures will be featured in a 15-month 2011 calendar which will be available in September. Now, Georgia-Pacific and the St. Johns River Alliance are asking the public to help select the grand prize winner. (Logo:...

2008-10-02 18:00:14

By Ronald L. Littlepage I'm going to get my hopes up once again. For years, I've pushed the idea of capitalizing on our beautiful waterways to attract tourists to our area, as well as provide our residents an opportunity to enjoy our great natural resources. Try this scenario: Take a tour of Kingsley Plantation and then board a boat for a trip along the Fort George River to the Intracoastal Waterway and on across the St. Johns River to Fort Caroline. A tour guide would tell the...

2008-10-02 18:00:14

By STEVE PATTERSON SANFORD - A high-stakes legal fight over using St. Johns River water in Central Florida utilities opened Wednesday with lawyers arguing about the need for and impact of the river withdrawal. An administrative law judge could spend most of this month hearing witnesses before deciding which argument should prevail. The St. Johns Riverkeeper, Jacksonville City Hall and St. Johns County are all fighting a proposal to withdraw water for Seminole County residents to use in...

2008-09-26 18:00:29

By STEVE PATTERSON ORLANDO -- Water wars like the fight over St. Johns River withdrawals will only grow unless Florida learns to manage its water better, experts and policymakers meeting Thursday said. But the same group, which included Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton and whose ideas are supposed to help state lawmakers find some solutions, struggled to agree among themselves how to do that. "My thought is, scratch it," environmental activist Charles Lee said as a circle of delegates at a...

2008-09-26 18:00:29

By RONALD L. LITTLEPAGE The St. Johns River, always beautiful, especially sparkles on a fresh fall day when the temperature finally dips into the 50s after a long, hot summer. Thursday was such a day in Jacksonville and the river, indeed, sparkled. The sight was a vivid reminder of why we must protect the city's greatest natural resource, the St. Johns River. As you know, battle lines have been drawn over a proposal by the St. Johns River Water Management District to withdraw hundreds...

2008-09-23 18:00:21

By DAVID HUNT Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama said reducing Jacksonville's murder rate and protecting the St. Johns River would be priorities for him in the White House. While the Illinois senator did not grant any one-on-one interviews with local media after a First Coast campaign stop Saturday, he fielded several Times-Union questions by e-mail on Sunday in what campaign aides termed an "exclusive." In Jacksonville, we have the distinction of being the "murder capital of...

2008-09-22 18:00:19

By Steve Patterson GAINESVILLE - Taking too much water from the St. Johns River could fuel toxic algae blooms and suck water from underground aquifers, scientists meeting Sept. 17 said. But it could be two years before they will be ready to agree exactly how much withdrawal would have to happen to become a real problem. It's the central question behind research that's still evolving while communities from Jacksonville to Central Florida feud over proposals to use the river's vast flow...

2008-09-18 18:00:29

By STEVE PATTERSON GAINESVILLE -- Taking too much water from the St. Johns River could fuel toxic algae blooms and suck water from underground aquifers, scientists meeting Wednesday said. But it could be two years before those scientists will be ready to agree exactly how much withdrawal would have to happen to become a real problem. It's the central question behind research that's still evolving while communities from Jacksonville to Central Florida feud over proposals to use the...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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