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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest Stacey Combes Stories

Dragonflies Are The Flying Aces Of The Insect World
2011-10-04 05:03:37

[ Watch the Video ] Research focuses on aerial feats such as hunting and mating in mid-air Next time you see a dragonfly, try to watch it catch its next meal on the go. Good luck! "Unless we film it in high speed, we can't see whether it caught the prey, but when it gets back to its perch, if we see it chewing, we know that it was successful," says Stacey Combes, a biomechanist at Harvard University. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), she and her team are...

2009-06-08 14:20:33

Harvard University scientists have determined some bees brace themselves against wind and turbulence by extending their hind legs while flying. Wind is a universal part of life for all flying animals, Assistant Professor Stacey Combes said. Yet we know remarkably little about how animals navigate windy conditions and unpredictable airflows, since most studies of animal flight have taken place in simplified environments, such as in still air or perfect laminar flows. Combes and Robert Dudley...

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2009-06-02 13:56:41

Turbulence hampers flight for various bee species, and possibly other insects New research shows some bees brace themselves against wind and turbulence by extending their sturdy hind legs while flying. But this approach comes at a steep cost, increasing aerodynamic drag and the power required for flight by roughly 30 percent, and cutting into the bees' flight performance. The findings are detailed in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "Wind is a universal part of life for...