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Latest Stanford Researchers Stories

Hedgehog Rovers Will Bounce, Hop, Leap Their Way Over Martian Moon Phobos
2013-01-03 07:06:46

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Stanford University researchers, working with NASA´s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and MIT, have designed a new robotic platform that could be used to explore the moons of Mars. The platform consists of a mother spacecraft and anywhere from one to several spiky, spherical rovers that can be deployed on the surface of a moon, such as Phobos, where they can hop, roll and tumble their way across rugged terrain. Each rover,...

America's Clean Energy Policies Need A Reality Check, Say Stanford Researchers
2012-05-02 07:17:03

America's approach to clean energy needs to be reformed if it is to meaningfully affect energy security or the environment, according to two new articles by Stanford writers. The debate over how to fundamentally change the world's massive energy system comes amid taxpayers' $500 million tab for the bankruptcy of Fremont, Calif., solar company Solyndra, the global recession, government budget cuts and plunging U.S. prices for natural gas. Making the change cost-effectively will be crucial,...

2011-07-13 13:08:58

In an era of skyrocketing health-care costs and finite financial resources, health economists are increasingly called upon to determine which medical treatments are the most cost-effective. To do so, they compare the price of an intervention with the improvement it is expected to deliver. For example, a highly advanced cold medicine that costs $5,000 to deliver just one additional symptom-free day to the average patient would appear to be a less-wise investment than a new chemotherapy that...

2011-03-21 16:37:31

If a big bunch of your brain cells suddenly went rogue and decided to become fat cells, it could cloud your decision-making capacity a bit. Fortunately, early in an organism's development, cells make firm and more-or-less permanent decisions about whether they will live their lives as, say, skin cells, brain cells or, well, fat cells. Those decisions essentially boil down to which proteins, among all the possible candidates encoded in a cell's genes, the cell will tend to make under ordinary...

2011-03-15 20:51:32

When vital proteins in our bodies are misfolded, debilitating diseases can result. If researchers could see the folding happen, they might be able to design treatments for some of these diseases or even keep them from occurring. But many of our most critical proteins are folded, hidden from sight, inside tiny molecular chambers. Now researchers at Stanford have gotten the first-ever peek inside one of these protein-folding chambers as the folding happened, and the folding mechanism they saw...

2008-09-22 03:00:13

Two scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine who've sussed out ways to see what's usually hidden are winners of this year's NIH Director's Pioneer Awards--the National Institutes of Health's most prestigious award for creative thinkers. Secrets held within a living being's brain and a developing embryo, respectively, are the objects of the research pursued by the award winners, Ricardo Dolmetsch, PhD, and James Chen, PhD. The NIH will announce this year's 16 Pioneer...

2008-09-17 15:00:37

Cancer researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered a promising new chemotherapy target for a deadly form of leukemia. Their discovery hinges on a novel "double agent" role for a molecular signal that regulates cell growth. The rogue signal, glycogen synthase kinase 3, was previously found to halt uncontrolled cell growth, preventing several forms of cancer. It also keeps growth of healthy cells in check. But new data show that GSK3 fuels a deadly form of...

2008-07-07 12:00:12

Kidney cancer patients generally have one option for beating their disease: surgery to remove the organ. But that could change, thanks to a new molecule found by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers that kills kidney cancer cells. Ideally, the researchers said, a drug created from this molecule would help fight the life-threatening disease while leaving patients' kidneys intact. "You now have a potential means of going after a disease that's been difficult to treat," said...

2008-07-02 00:00:28

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a method that can predict with 70 percent accuracy whether a woman undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment will become pregnant. This information may someday help the tens of thousands of couples who want to undergo IVF each year, and their doctors, decide on their course of action. The new method involves using four factors to determine a woman's chance of becoming pregnant from an IVF cycle. These variables...

2008-07-01 00:14:24

Cancer starts when key cellular signals run amok, driving uncontrolled cell growth. But scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine report that lowering levels of one cancer signal under a specific threshold reverses this process in mice, returning tumor cells to their normal, healthy state. The finding could help target cancer chemotherapy to tumors while minimizing side effects for the body's healthy cells. The researchers identified a precise threshold level of the...


Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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