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Latest Stanford University Stories

2011-10-13 10:10:56

A political candidate's electoral victory or defeat is influenced by his or her stance on climate change policy, according to new Stanford University studies of the most recent presidential and congressional elections. "These studies are a coordinated effort looking at whether candidates' statements on climate change translated into real votes," said Jon Krosnick, professor of communication and of political science at Stanford, who led two new studies — one of the 2008 presidential...

Mountain Lions Visit Stanford Preserve
2011-10-07 09:18:53

[ Watch the Video ] Researchers at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve often encounter signs of mountain lion activity, from lion scat to the occasional deer carcass covered with leaves. But few have actually caught a glimpse of the shy feline. Now, images captured by remote wildlife cameras confirm that mountain lions (also called pumas or cougars) make regular visits to Stanford's 1,189-acre preserve in the hills five miles west of the main campus. Since September 2009, a...

Premature Birth May Up Risk Of Epilepsy Later In Life
2011-10-04 06:22:21

Being born prematurely may increase your risk of developing epilepsy as an adult, according to a new study published in the October 4, 2011, issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "We found a strong connection between preterm birth and risk of epilepsy and the risk appears to increase dramatically the earlier the birth occurs during pregnancy," said study author Casey Crump, MD, PhD, of Stanford University in Stanford, California. "More effective...

2011-09-28 19:34:42

Trio of papers describe in unprecedented detail a major molecular target for drugs Three international teams of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California San Diego, University of Michigan and Stanford University, have published a trio of papers describing in unprecedented detail the structure and workings of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), a large family of human proteins that are the target of one-third to one-half of modern drugs. Two of the papers are...

2011-09-14 07:00:00

New national center launches to infuse entrepreneurship and innovation skills into undergraduate engineering education Stanford, CA (PRWEB) September 14, 2011 Today the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (EPI.Center) launches operation to create seismic change in how undergraduate engineers are educated in the United States. The EPI.Center, based at Stanford University's School of Engineering, will serve as an education, research and outreach hub for the creation and...

2011-09-12 14:53:58

The first transgenic mouse model of a rare and severe type of autism called Timothy Syndrome is improving the scientific understanding of autism spectrum disorder in general and may help researchers design more targeted interventions and treatments. The research is described in a paper published last week by scientists at the University at Buffalo and Stanford University in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The transgenic mouse developed at UB exhibits the repetitive...

2011-09-08 10:09:35

A different approach to studying the heart may uncover paths for new and improved cardiac treatments n the United States, almost half a million people die every year because their hearts beat too fast or too slow--a disease called cardiac arrhythmia. Although researchers and doctors have taken great strides to understand the heart, cardiovascular disease is still the primary cause of death in the industrialized world. Scientists have long developed cardiac therapies through...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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