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Latest Stanford University Stories

Premature Birth May Up Risk Of Epilepsy Later In Life
2011-10-04 06:22:21

Being born prematurely may increase your risk of developing epilepsy as an adult, according to a new study published in the October 4, 2011, issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "We found a strong connection between preterm birth and risk of epilepsy and the risk appears to increase dramatically the earlier the birth occurs during pregnancy," said study author Casey Crump, MD, PhD, of Stanford University in Stanford, California. "More effective...

2011-09-28 19:34:42

Trio of papers describe in unprecedented detail a major molecular target for drugs Three international teams of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California San Diego, University of Michigan and Stanford University, have published a trio of papers describing in unprecedented detail the structure and workings of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), a large family of human proteins that are the target of one-third to one-half of modern drugs. Two of the papers are...

2011-09-14 07:00:00

New national center launches to infuse entrepreneurship and innovation skills into undergraduate engineering education Stanford, CA (PRWEB) September 14, 2011 Today the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (EPI.Center) launches operation to create seismic change in how undergraduate engineers are educated in the United States. The EPI.Center, based at Stanford University's School of Engineering, will serve as an education, research and outreach hub for the creation and...

2011-09-12 14:53:58

The first transgenic mouse model of a rare and severe type of autism called Timothy Syndrome is improving the scientific understanding of autism spectrum disorder in general and may help researchers design more targeted interventions and treatments. The research is described in a paper published last week by scientists at the University at Buffalo and Stanford University in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The transgenic mouse developed at UB exhibits the repetitive...

2011-09-08 10:09:35

A different approach to studying the heart may uncover paths for new and improved cardiac treatments n the United States, almost half a million people die every year because their hearts beat too fast or too slow--a disease called cardiac arrhythmia. Although researchers and doctors have taken great strides to understand the heart, cardiovascular disease is still the primary cause of death in the industrialized world. Scientists have long developed cardiac therapies through...

humpback whale
2011-08-29 08:43:40

  Preserving just 4 percent of the ocean could protect crucial habitat for the vast majority of marine mammal species, from sea otters to blue whales, according to researchers at Stanford University and the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Their findings were published in the Aug. 16 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Of the 129 species of marine mammals on Earth, including seals, dolphins and polar bears, approximately one-quarter are...

spacepress-082611-002
2011-08-26 07:12:15

  Imagine forecasting a hurricane in Miami weeks before the storm was even a swirl of clouds off the coast of Africa–or predicting a tornado in Kansas from the flutter of a butterfly's wing(1) in Texas. These are the kind of forecasts meteorologists can only dream about. Could the dream come true? A new study by Stanford researchers suggests that such forecasts may one day be possible–not on Earth, but on the sun. "We have learned to detect sunspots before they are...

90401009
2011-08-22 12:44:20

A Stanford University scientist is claiming that interbreeding between human ancestors and Neanderthals that took place between 65,000 and 90,000 years ago may have helped our kind survive and gain evolutionary dominance. According to Peter Parham, an immunology expert at the California university's medical school, crossbreeding between the two species "provided humans with a ready-mixed cocktail of disease-resistant genes when the species first ventured out of its native Africa," Graeme...

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2011-08-19 15:56:23

When a male rat senses the presence of a fetching female rat, a certain region of his brain lights up with neural activity, in anticipation of romance. Now Stanford University researchers have discovered that in male rats infected with the parasite Toxoplasma, the same region responds just as strongly to the odor of cat urine. Is it time to dim the lights and cue the Rachmaninoff for some cross-species canoodling? "Well, we see activity in the pathway that normally controls how male...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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