Quantcast

Latest Stefan Immler Stories

NASA’s Swift Maps Magellanic Clouds With Ultraviolet
2013-06-04 07:38:12

April Flowers for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Using NASA´s Swift satellite, astronomers from NASA and Pennsylvania State University have created the most detailed ultraviolet surveys to-date of the two closest major galaxies, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. "We took thousands of images and assembled them into seamless portraits of the main body of each galaxy, resulting in the highest-resolution surveys of the Magellanic Clouds at ultraviolet wavelengths,"...

Image 1 - Astrophysicists Gain Insight Into Star Creation From NASA Satellite
2012-03-21 07:47:08

NASA's Swift satellite puts faraway stars and galaxies under a new lens. A combination of X-ray and ultraviolet observations from NASA's Swift satellite allow researchers to gain a more detailed look at specific stars and their activities. Most recently Swift was used to study a Type Ia supernova. While it's been known that Type Ia supernovae originate with a remnant star called a white dwarf, the X-ray and ultraviolet views allow researchers to view the events and matter that cause the...

256115f164239da51e9ff7c9ddf846411
2009-09-16 11:15:00

In a break from its usual task of searching for distant cosmic explosions, NASA's Swift satellite has acquired the highest-resolution view of a neighboring spiral galaxy ever attained in the ultraviolet. The galaxy, known as M31 in the constellation Andromeda, is the largest and closest spiral galaxy to our own. "Swift reveals about 20,000 ultraviolet sources in M31, especially hot, young stars and dense star clusters," said Stefan Immler, a research scientist on the Swift team at NASA's...

340e2b6d30371e4bc648d11b6f7f50b11
2008-02-26 08:50:00

Imagine looking at a tree through eyeglasses that only allow red light to pass through. The tree is going to look a lot different than how it would look without the glasses. The same goes for a galaxy when astronomers look at it through different types of telescopes. This new image from NASA's Swift satellite demonstrates what happens when astronomers look at a galaxy in ultraviolet light rather than the visible light that we see with our eyes. Swift took the image through a series of filters...

a373b9151166d30a4a1f72543a8b76c11
2007-04-04 13:20:00

In a galaxy far, far away, a massive star suffered a nasty double whammy. On Oct. 20, 2004, Japanese amateur astronomer Koichi Itagaki saw the star let loose an outburst so bright that it was initially mistaken for a supernova. The star survived, but for only two years. On Oct. 11, 2006, professional and amateur astronomers witnessed the star actually blowing itself to smithereens as Supernova 2006jc. "We have never observed a stellar outburst and then later seen the star explode," says...

1e273da7c82b84e77e2129febe82ec47
2006-10-06 05:25:00

Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite have observed two dozen recent star explosions, called supernovae, quickly after the event and have discovered never-before-seen properties, some of which run counter to prevailing theories. In one observation, they have confirmed the origin of Type Ia supernovae, an important class of explosions used to measure distances and dark energy. In other observations they have found new mechanisms to produce X-rays and ultraviolet light. The findings have...

9415362c619147d4b44fce3f9adf45dd1
2005-11-30 11:43:06

NASA -- Scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have witnessed a cosmic rite of passage, the transition from a supernova to a supernova remnant, a process that has never seen in much detail until now, leaving it poorly defined. A supernova is a massive star explosion; the remnant is the beautiful glowing shell that evolves afterwards. When does a supernova become supernova remnant? When does the shell appear and what powers its radiant glow? A science team led by Dr. Stefan Immler...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
Related