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Latest Stefan Rahmstorf Stories

2013-11-22 11:37:17

In contrast, for a scenario with strong emissions reductions, experts expect a sea-level rise of 40-60 centimeters by 2100 and 60-100 centimeters by 2300. The survey was conducted by a team of scientists from the USA and Germany. "While the results for the scenario with climate mitigation suggest a good chance of limiting future sea-level rise to one meter, the high emissions scenario would threaten the survival of some coastal cities and low-lying islands," says Stefan Rahmstorf from the...

Research Shows Sea-Level Rise Is Much Faster Than Previously Reported
2012-11-28 12:18:17

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been keeping a close eye on rising sea levels and has released several reports outlining the forecasts for the future of our world´s oceans. In its fourth assessment report, released in 2007, the IPCC estimated sea levels were rising at a rate of 0.08 inches per year based on satellite data. But new research from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Tempo...

2012-06-25 16:49:04

Sea levels around the world can be expected to rise by several meters in coming centuries, if global warming carries on The study is the first to give a comprehensive projection for this long perspective, based on observed sea-level rise over the past millennium, as well as on scenarios for future greenhouse-gas emissions. "Sea-level rise is a hard to quantify, yet critical risk of climate change," says Michiel Schaeffer of Climate Analytics and Wageningen University, lead author of the...

Recent Extreme Weather Events Caused By Man-Made Global Warming: Scientists
2012-03-26 13:33:21

According to new study, extreme weather events that the Earth has experienced in the past decade were caused by global warming. The World Meteorological Organization said on Friday that last year was the eleventh hottest year on record for the earth. The U.S. suffered 14 weather events in 2011, causing over $1 billion in damages for each event. On March 13 and 19 this year, historical heat records exceeded in over 1,000 places in North America. Scientists at Germany's Potsdam...

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2011-04-09 06:05:00

New forecasts on rising sea levels suggest that New York will be a big loser, while some regions, including those closer to polar regions, will win big, reports BBC News.. A 2007 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change forecast sea levels to rise by as much as 1 foot by 2100. But that forecast was a global average. A Dutch team has now made an attempt to model all the factors leading to regional variations. And whatever the global figure turns out to be, there will be...

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2010-12-22 12:42:10

A new study has found that global warming is playing a major role in driving the string of freezing European winters over the past decade. According to the study, the culprit is the Arctic's receding surface ice, which scientists believe could disappear entirely by the century's end. The study reports that the mechanism uncovered triples the chances that future winters in Europe and north Asia will be similarly inclement. Cold weather has wreaked havoc throughout Europe during the winter...

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2010-02-22 15:45:00

A 2009 claim that sea levels would rise up to 32 inches by the end of the century, is being retracted, as the original report's author says the real estimate is still not known. Scientists have discovered mistakes that undermine the projected sea level increase that would be affected by global warming. The study, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, confirmed the conclusions of a 2007 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The 2009 study collected data from the...

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2009-09-30 06:03:09

At an Oxford University climate conference, experts announced that sea levels across the globe will almost inevitably rise more than 6 feet. "The crux of the sea level issue is that it starts very slowly but once it gets going it is practically unstoppable," said Stefan Rahmstorf, a scientist at Germany's Potsdam Institute and a broadly respected sea level expert. "There is no way I can see to stop this rise, even if we have gone to zero emissions." According to Rahmstorf, the best outcome...

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2006-11-10 09:18:35

NAIROBI, Kenya - The world's oceans are becoming more acidic, which poses a threat to sea life and Earth's fragile food chain, a climate expert said Thursday. Oceans have already absorbed a third of the world's emissions of carbon dioxide, one of the heat-trapping gases blamed for global warming, leading to acidification that prevents vital sea life from forming properly. "The oceans are rapidly changing," said professor Stefan Rahmstorf on the sidelines of a U.N. conference on climate change...