Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 17:20 EDT

Latest Stellar evolution Stories

Shaping A Blooming Star
2013-09-27 10:36:32

[ Watch The Video: CSIRO’s Australia Telescope Compact Array ] John P. Millis, PhD for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Many objects in the Universe contain jets – intense magnetic fields twisted around their axes, ejecting plasma into the Cosmos. In general, however, these objects tend to be powerful, exotic entities such as black holes and neutron stars. Or, at the other end of the spectrum, forming stars – called proto-stars – can form such jet structures as well, but on...

Magnetic Jets Stars Final Transformation
2013-09-17 12:37:48

John P. Millis, PhD for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In general, main sequence stars die in one of two ways: high mass stars, those several times larger than our Sun, will explode in brilliant supernovae, leaving behind a shock remnant with a dense neutron star or black hole at its center. Lower mass stars like our Sun will transition into a planetary nebula. The outer envelope of the star is expressed into the interstellar medium, and the star’s gravity relinquishes its grip....

Hubble Space Telescope
2013-09-14 03:38:45

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) report that they have solved the mystery of why none of the unusually small galaxies known as “red nuggets” were seen nearby – they were essentially hiding in plain sight. These “red nuggets,” so named because of their miniature size and the fact that they are densely packed with stars of that color, had only been observed in the distant, young...

Milky Way In 3D
2013-09-13 11:09:37

John P. Millis, PhD for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Because of our location within the Milky Way, it is quite a challenge to get a bird’s eye view of our galaxy. To really get a sense for what our corner of the cosmos really looks like, astronomers have to take detailed measurements of billions of stars and attempt to accurately measure their distance from Earth. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) have now created the most detailed model...

Clumpy Structure Makes Disk Galaxies Look Alike Over Time
2013-09-12 06:49:36

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers at Iowa State University and IBM have identified why virtually all disk galaxies grow out of their irregular, clumped appearance, and why their older stars acquire the same smooth look as they fade from a bright center to a faint edge. The astronomers say that whether these young disk galaxies are big, small, isolated or crowded in a cluster, the reason they all eventually look alike is due to their clumpy structure,...

Bizarre Alignment Observed In Butterfly-Shaped Nebulae
2013-09-04 08:57:07

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study by astronomers from the University of Manchester shows how planetary nebulae line up in the sky in the same way. A planetary nebula occurs in the final stages of a star's life when its outer layers begin to stretch out into the surrounding space. Such nebulae can create beautiful objects in the night sky, with some stretching out into an hourglass or butterfly shape. The latest research, published in the Monthly Notices of...

Nova Visible With Naked Eye
2013-08-20 10:36:11

John P. Millis, PhD for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online White dwarfs – small balls of carbon and oxygen, the core remnants of Sun-like stars that reached the ends of their lives – give off a soft glow of light, slowly fading as the heat from their surfaces escapes into the coldness of space. These dead cores will eventually dim and cool, as nuclear fusion has long ceased. However, there are some that live on. These white dwarfs orbit in close binary systems with another star. If...

Why Do Quenched Galaxies Seem To Keep Growing?
2013-08-02 04:02:20

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Thanks to new data obtained from the Hubble Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS), researchers have solved the mystery as to why some galaxies appear to grow larger even after they no longer form new stars. Once galaxies reach a point in their lives when they cease star formation, they are known as "quenched" galaxies, report the authors of the new study. Quenched galaxies in the distant past appear to be much smaller than those...

Life Of Eskimo Nebula Coming To A Beautiful End
2013-07-13 08:19:42

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online At the end of their lives, stars like our Sun become remarkably photogenic. For example, NGC 2392, located approximately 4,200 light years from Earth, is giving astronomers a beautiful display as it nears the end of its existence. NGC 2392, referred to as a "planetary nebula," has been nicknamed the Eskimo Nebula; however "planetary nebula" is misleading because nebulae have nothing to do with planets. Rather, the term is an...

Monstrous Stellar Collisions Not Expected To Occur Anytime Soon
2013-07-11 14:32:31

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Astrophysicists from the Astronomical Observatory of the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw say the next collision of monstrous stars will not occur until billions of years from now. Three years ago, scientists discovered that the Magellanic Clouds host gigantic stars with between 200 and 300 times the solar mass  of our own Sun. Before then, astronomers believed that the biggest stars in the Universe did not...


Latest Stellar evolution Reference Libraries

Stellar Astrophysics
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The prominent feature that allows for the existence of life on Earth is the Sun. Radiation from our closest star provides heat and energy to our planet, driving biological processes and providing the necessary conditions for liquid water to naturally exist. But our Sun is only but one star in this vast Universe. And as it turns out, most stars are quite different than the one that illuminates our day. For this reason, scientists have, for hundreds of years, attempted to study the other...

7_4b235c0bfbfc8504a41844f9c48ad8962
2004-10-19 04:45:43

Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram -- In stellar astronomy, the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (H-R diagram) shows the relation between the absolute magnitude and the spectral types of stars. It was invented around 1910 by Ejnar Hertzsprung and Henry Norris Russell. There are two equivalent forms. One is the observer's form which plots the color of the star on one axis and the absolute magnitude on the other axis. The theoretician's form plots the temperature of the star on one axis and the...

6_c21be0ecb1b565a9be109a383c38223f2
2004-10-19 04:45:43

White Dwarf -- A white dwarf is a a star supported by electron degeneracy. A star like our Sun will become a white dwarf when it has exhausted its nuclear fuel. Near the end of its nuclear burning stage, such a star goes through a red giant phase and then expels most of its outer material (creating a planetary nebula) until only the hot (T > 100,000 K) core remains, which then settles down to become a young white dwarf. A typical white dwarf is half as massive as the Sun, yet only...

6_19859ff34fd03d00777232e2520ce83f5
2004-10-19 04:45:42

Supernova Remnant -- A supernova remnant (SNR) is made up of the materials left behind by the gigantic explosion of a star in a supernova. There are two possible routes to this end: either a massive star may cease to generate fusion energy in its core, and collapse inward under the force of its own gravity, or a white dwarf star may accumulate material from a companion star until it reaches a critical mass and undergoes a similar collapse. In either case, the resulting supernova...

6_79c799b9f03f60809a9d0aecf38491202
2004-10-19 04:45:42

Supernova -- A supernova is a star that increases its brightness drastically within a matter of days, making it appear as if a "new" star was born (hence "nova"). The "super" prefix distinguishes it from a mere nova, which also involves a star increasing in brightness, though to a lesser extent and through a much different mechanism. Astronomers have classified supernovae in several classes, according to the lines of different elements that appear in their spectra. The first...

More Articles (13 articles) »