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Latest Stellar evolution Stories

Massive Winds Driven By Intense Star Formation
2012-08-22 05:30:05

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Fueled by an intense burst of star formation, fierce galactic winds may blow gas right out of massive galaxies, which in turn could shut down their ability to make new stars. A team of astronomers sifted through images and data from three telescopes to find 29 objects with outflowing winds measuring up to 2,500 kilometers per second, an order of magnitude faster than most observed galactic winds. "They're nearly blowing themselves...

Searching For Supernova Progenitors
2012-08-04 06:23:15

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A progenitor of a type 1a supernova may have been found, according to findings published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Astronomers believe that type 1a supernovae are thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf star that is part of a binary system, which is two stars that are physically close and orbit a common center of mass. The white dwarf has mass gradually given to it by its companion star, and...

Supernova Shock Wave And Its Role In Solar System Formation
2012-08-03 09:04:16

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It has long been thought that our Solar System was formed by the shockwave from a supernova explosion. According to this theory, the shockwave also injected material from the exploding star into a cloud of gas and dust. The newly polluted cloud formed the Sun and its surrounding planets. A new study by Alan Boss and Sandra Keiser of the Carnegie Institution for Science, published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, provides the...

New research using data from ESO’s Very Large Telescope has revealed that the hottest and brightest stars, which are known as O stars, are often found in close pairs. Many of such binaries transfer mass from one star to another, a kind of stellar vampirism depicted in this artist’s impression. Credi
2012-07-26 21:17:49

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The brightest stars in the universe apparently do not like to live alone, according to a new study using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). Nearly three-quarters of the brightest, high mass stars are found to have a close companion star, which is far more than previous thought. Most of these pairs of stars are also experiencing disruptive interactions, like mass transfer from one star to the other. Another third of them are expected...

Dark galaxies spotted for the first time
2012-07-11 15:01:14

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Dark galaxies may have been spotted for the very first time using the European Space Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT). An international team of astronomers believe they have detected these elusive objects by observing them as they were lit up by glowing quasars. Dark galaxies are very small, gas-rich galaxies in the early universe that are inefficient at forming stars. Scientists believe these galaxies are building blocks of...

Wide-field view of the Andromeda Galaxy
2012-06-02 08:41:25

Unfortunately, stars don't have birth certificates. So, astronomers have a tough time figuring out their ages. Knowing a star's age is critical for understanding how our Milky Way galaxy built itself up over billions of years from smaller galaxies. Jason Kalirai of the Space Telescope Science Institute and The Johns Hopkins University's Center for Astrophysical Sciences, both in Baltimore, Md., has found the next best thing to a star's birth certificate. Using a new technique, Kalirai...

Two Different Sources for Supernova, Both Models Are Correct
2012-05-07 10:40:40

The exploding stars known as Type Ia supernovae serve an important role in measuring the universe, and were used to discover the existence of dark energy. They're bright enough to see across large distances, and similar enough to act as a "standard candle" - an object of known luminosity. The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the discovery of the accelerating universe using Type Ia supernovae. However, an embarrassing fact is that astronomers still don't know what star systems make...

2012-05-02 06:21:01

WASHINGTON, May 2, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Astronomers have gathered the most direct evidence yet of a supermassive black hole shredding a star that wandered too close. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer, a space-based observatory, and the Pan-STARRS1 telescope on the summit of Haleakala in Hawaii, were among the first to help identify the stellar remains. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Supermassive black holes, weighing millions to billions times more...

Hubble Images Searchlight Beams From A Preplanetary Nebula
2012-04-27 09:52:56

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has been at the cutting edge of research into what happens to stars like our sun at the ends of their lives. One stage that stars pass through as they run out of nuclear fuel is called the preplanetary or protoplanetary nebula stage. This Hubble image of the Egg Nebula shows one of the best views to date of this brief but dramatic phase in a star´s life. The preplanetary nebula phase is a short period in the cycle of stellar evolution, and has...

2012-04-13 03:26:20

A University of Oklahoma assistant professor and colleagues have identified two white dwarf stars considered the oldest and closest known to man.  Astronomers identified these 11- to 12-billion-year-old white dwarf stars only 100 light years away from Earth.  These stars are the closest known examples of the oldest stars in the Universe forming soon after the Big Bang, according to the OU researcher. Mukremin Kilic, assistant professor of physics and astronomy in the OU College...


Latest Stellar evolution Reference Libraries

Stellar Astrophysics
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The prominent feature that allows for the existence of life on Earth is the Sun. Radiation from our closest star provides heat and energy to our planet, driving biological processes and providing the necessary conditions for liquid water to naturally exist. But our Sun is only but one star in this vast Universe. And as it turns out, most stars are quite different than the one that illuminates our day. For this reason, scientists have, for hundreds of years, attempted to study the other...

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2004-10-19 04:45:43

Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram -- In stellar astronomy, the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (H-R diagram) shows the relation between the absolute magnitude and the spectral types of stars. It was invented around 1910 by Ejnar Hertzsprung and Henry Norris Russell. There are two equivalent forms. One is the observer's form which plots the color of the star on one axis and the absolute magnitude on the other axis. The theoretician's form plots the temperature of the star on one axis and the...

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2004-10-19 04:45:43

White Dwarf -- A white dwarf is a a star supported by electron degeneracy. A star like our Sun will become a white dwarf when it has exhausted its nuclear fuel. Near the end of its nuclear burning stage, such a star goes through a red giant phase and then expels most of its outer material (creating a planetary nebula) until only the hot (T > 100,000 K) core remains, which then settles down to become a young white dwarf. A typical white dwarf is half as massive as the Sun, yet only...

6_19859ff34fd03d00777232e2520ce83f5
2004-10-19 04:45:42

Supernova Remnant -- A supernova remnant (SNR) is made up of the materials left behind by the gigantic explosion of a star in a supernova. There are two possible routes to this end: either a massive star may cease to generate fusion energy in its core, and collapse inward under the force of its own gravity, or a white dwarf star may accumulate material from a companion star until it reaches a critical mass and undergoes a similar collapse. In either case, the resulting supernova...

6_79c799b9f03f60809a9d0aecf38491202
2004-10-19 04:45:42

Supernova -- A supernova is a star that increases its brightness drastically within a matter of days, making it appear as if a "new" star was born (hence "nova"). The "super" prefix distinguishes it from a mere nova, which also involves a star increasing in brightness, though to a lesser extent and through a much different mechanism. Astronomers have classified supernovae in several classes, according to the lines of different elements that appear in their spectra. The first...

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