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Latest Stephen Quake Stories

2014-05-06 15:10:36

Recent research has shown that tiny fragments of DNA circulating in a person's blood can allow scientists to monitor cancer growth and even get a sneak peek into a developing fetus' gene sequences. But isolating and sequencing these bits of genetic material renders little insight into how that DNA is used to generate the dizzying array of cells, tissues and biological processes that define our bodies and our lives. Now researchers at Stanford University have moved beyond relying on the...

2013-11-21 13:04:03

Genomic analysis of transplant patients finds an opportunistic microorganism whose elevated presence could be used an indicator in treatment More than 260,000 Americans are alive today thanks to transplant operations that have replaced their failing kidneys, hearts, lungs or livers with healthy organs donated by volunteers or accident victims. But treatment doesn't end with surgery. Transplant recipients follow strict drug regimens designed to suppress their immune systems just enough...

First Genetic Sequence Of Individual Human Sperm
2012-07-20 07:58:23

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Sperm cells can look the same with a similar tadpole appearance. However, the cells showcase differences among the genes. Recently, researchers were able to capture an image of the varieties among genes which they say is particularly helpful in understanding the genome and male fertility. The research is featured in the July 20 edition of Cell, a Cell Press journal. The scientists believe that the methods used could help...

2010-06-29 02:35:53

Using new technology that allows scientists to monitor how individual cells react in the complex system of cell signaling, Stanford University researchers have uncovered a much larger spectrum of differences between each cell than ever seen before. Cells don't all act in a uniform fashion, as was previously thought. "Think of cells as musicians in a jazz band," said Markus Covert, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering and senior author of the study, which will be published online in...

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2009-08-11 06:10:00

When scientists first mapped out the human DNA in 2001, each attempt cost hundreds of millions of dollars and took an average of 250 people. In 2008, when the cost was $250,000, genome sequencing still took 200 people. In a paper available on Aug. 9 in Nature Biotechnology, a Stanford University professor announces that sequencing his entire genome took $50,000 and two other people. Basically, a task that cost the amount of a Boeing 747 airplane and needed enough people to fill half the plane...

2009-01-27 07:00:00

-- New Technology May Allow Development of Accurate Blood Test for Common Genetic Disorders Early in Pregnancy -- MENLO PARK, Calif., Jan. 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Artemis Health Inc., a privately-held company dedicated to the development of non-invasive prenatal diagnostic tests, today announced that it has acquired a co-exclusive worldwide license from Stanford University to develop cell-free fetal DNA prenatal diagnostic tests based on pioneering research from the lab of Stephen Quake, Ph.D.,...

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2008-10-07 07:00:00

Scientists say a prenatal blood test can determine if an unborn baby has Down's syndrome, without the risk to the fetus from past invasive testing methods, according to U.S. researchers. Stephen Quake led a team of researchers at Stanford University in California to create a way to look for the extra chromosomes that cause Down's and similar birth detects. Babies with Down's syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, causing physical and intellectual impairments. The test also detects...

2008-10-06 18:00:36

Pregnant women worried about their babies' genetic health face a tough decision: get prenatal gene testing and risk miscarriage, or skip the tests and miss the chance to learn of genetic defects before birth. But a new prenatal test could make this dilemma obsolete. The new method, developed by scientists at Stanford University, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, requires only a maternal blood sample to spot chromosomal disorders such as Down...

2008-08-31 15:00:43

The fight against the liver disease hepatitis C has been at something of an impasse for years, with more than 150 million people currently infected, and traditional antiviral treatments causing nasty side effects and often falling short of a cure. Using a novel technique, medical and engineering researchers at Stanford University have discovered a vulnerable step in the virus' reproduction process that in lab testing could be effectively targeted with an obsolete antihistamine. The new...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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