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Latest Stephen Wroe Stories

Ancient Sabre-Like Toothed Predator Had Weaker Bite Than Domestic Cat
2013-07-02 10:13:13

Millions of years ago, a bizarre, pouched super-predator terrorized South America with huge saber-like teeth.

Humans Not Responsible For Megafauna Extinction
2013-05-07 09:05:58

A team of researchers has concluded that most species of gigantic animals that once roamed the Australian continent disappeared before the arrival of humans.

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2010-06-22 09:29:22

The robust jaws and formidable teeth of some of our ancestors and ape cousins may suggest that humans are wimps when it comes to producing a powerful bite: but a new study has found the opposite is true, with major implications for our understanding of diet in ancestral humans.

2008-04-16 14:49:50

Komodo dragons may have a wimpy bite for their size, but somehow the giant lizards manage to take down prey as large as water buffalos. A new study reveals that a few dozen razor-sharp teeth combined with beefy neck muscles make up for the reptile's dainty chomp. "The Komodo has a featherweight, space-frame skull and bites like a wimp, but a combination of very clever engineering and wickedly sharp teeth allow it to do serious damage," said Stephen Wroe, a...

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2008-04-14 10:15:00

The fearsome Komodo dragon is the world's largest living lizard and can take very large animal prey: now a new international study has revealed how it can be such an efficient killing machine despite having a wimpy bite and a featherweight skull.

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2008-01-17 09:05:00

Pound for pound, Australia’s extinct marsupial lion (Thylacoleo carnifex) would have made mince meat of today’s African lion (Panthera leo) had the two big hyper-carnivores ever squared off in a fight to the death, according to an Australian scientist.


Word of the Day
megalophonous
  • Having a loud voice; vociferous; clamorous.
  • Of grand or imposing sound.
The word 'megalophonous' comes from Greek roots meaning 'big' and 'sound'.