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Latest Sterol regulatory element binding protein Stories

2014-07-10 12:16:31

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council A network of signals active in almost all types of cancer sends the protein factories in our cells into overdrive, and may help fuel a tumor's uncontrolled growth, new research suggests. Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, identified a molecular trigger responsible for ratcheting up activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) – the cellular factory that makes the building blocks cancer cells need to keep...

2011-01-18 15:30:15

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. But heart disease is more than just one disease; there are many different 'flavors' that can result from a heart attack, high blood pressure, diabetes or other causes. In lipotoxic cardiomyopathy, for example, heart function is disrupted by fat accumulation in heart cells. Obesity and high-fat diets are major risk factors for lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. A team led by Rolf Bodmer, Ph.D. at Sanford-Burnham...

2011-01-04 14:27:29

An ingredient found in abundance in birch bark appears to have an array of metabolic benefits, according to new studies in animals that are reported in the January issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication. In mice, the compound known as betulin lowered cholesterol, helped prevent diet-induced obesity, and improved insulin sensitivity. Betulin-treated mice were also more resistant to developing atherosclerotic plaques in their arteries. Betulin works by targeting so-called sterol...

2010-12-02 07:40:45

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ The human brain is loaded with cholesterol, almost all of which has to be produced within the brain itself, where it is critical for normal brain functions. This study shows how critical cholesterol synthesis in the brain is derailed in mice with diabetes. The findings offer a new explanation for the neurologic and cerebral complications that come with diabetes, including cognitive dysfunction, depression, and an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to...

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2010-11-30 14:23:41

Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have discovered that diabetes is able to affect how much cholesterol the brain is able to produce. Scientists have discovered that brain cholesterol synthesis, which is the only source of cholesterol for the brain, dropped in several mouse models of diabetes.  "Since cholesterol is required by neurons to form synapses (connections) with other cells, this decrease in cholesterol could affect how nerves function for appetite regulation, behavior,...

2010-07-01 16:25:06

Better understanding of body's response to fasting may lead to therapies for metabolic disorders Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have found that an enzyme with several important roles in energy metabolism also helps to turn off the body's generation of fats and cholesterol under conditions of fasting. The report in Genes & Development describes how SIRT1, one of a group of enzymes called sirtuins, suppresses the activity of a family of proteins called SREBPs, which...

2010-05-14 10:07:51

Study identifies potential new strategy for raising 'good' cholesterol levels Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers have identified tiny segments of RNA that may play an important role in the body's regulation of cholesterol and lipids. Their study found that the miR-33 family of microRNAs suppress a protein known to be important for generation of HDL "“ the "good cholesterol" that transports lipids to the liver for disposal "“ and for the removal of cholesterol from...

2009-12-15 22:16:44

Inhibiting fatty acid synthesis in brain cancer cells may offer a new option to treat about 50 percent of deadly glioblastomas that are driven by amplified signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), according to a first-of-its-kind study by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Rapidly dividing cancer cells require fatty acids for the formation of new membranes. The fatty acids also provide an alternative energy source for the cancer cells, and may be...

2009-11-22 20:04:02

UBC-Brain Research Centre discovery Scientists at the Brain Research Centre, a partnership of the University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, have uncovered new information about the mechanism by which brain cells die following a stroke, as well as a possible way to mitigate that damage. The results of the study were recently published online in Nature Medicine. Following a stroke, many brain cells continue to die even after blood flow...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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