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Counting Fish Teeth Reveals Regulatory DNA Changes Behind

Counting Fish Teeth Reveals Regulatory DNA Changes Behind Rapid Evolution, Adaptation

Robert Sanders, University of California - Berkeley Sticklebacks, the roaches of the fish world, are the ideal animal in which to study the genes that control body shape. They’ve moved from the ocean into tens of thousands of freshwater...

Latest Stickleback Stories

2013-06-07 13:07:10

Many animals are able to discriminate between related and unrelated individuals but how they do so has proven remarkably difficult to understand. Joachim Frommen and colleagues at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have investigated the issue using the three-spined stickleback and its shoaling preferences as a model system. It turns out that the fish prefer kin to unrelated conspecifics, regardless of how familiar they are with individual shoal members. The results indicate that...

2012-04-04 21:14:45

Reuse of key genes is a common theme Three-spine sticklebacks aren't as pretty as many aquarium fish, and anglers don't fantasize about hooking one. But biologists treasure these small fish for what they are revealing about the genetic changes that drive evolution. Now, researchers have sequenced the stickleback genome for the first time, and they have discovered that as fish in different parts of the world adapted to live in fresh water, the same sites in the genome were changed time and...

2010-11-10 12:04:49

Carotenoid pigments are the source of many of the animal kingdom's most vivid colors; flamingos' pink feathers come from eating carotenoid-containing shrimps and algae, and carotenoid colors can be seen among garden birds in blackbirds' orange beaks and blue tits' yellow breast feathers. These pigments play a crucial role in sexual signals. According to the study's lead author Dr Tom Pike of the University of Exeter: "Females typically use carotenoid colors to assess the quality of a...

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2010-08-05 09:08:38

University of British Columbia researchers have observed one of the fastest evolutionary responses ever recorded in wild populations. In as little as three years, stickleback fish developed tolerance for water temperature 2.5 degrees Celsius lower than their ancestors. The study, published in the current issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, provides the some of the first experimental evidence that evolution may help populations survive effects of climate change. Measuring three to...

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2010-02-26 09:00:00

University of Oregon labs combine emerging technologies to identify gene regions underlying adaptation Twenty billion pieces of DNA in 100 small fish have opened the eyes of biologists studying evolution. After combining new technologies, researchers now know many of the genomic regions that allowed an ocean-dwelling fish to adapt to fresh water in several independently evolved populations. The discovery -- made possible in a project funded by the National Science Foundation and National...

2009-08-05 09:09:41

A gene previously associated with physical traits is also dictating behavior in a tiny fish widely regarded as a living model of Darwin's natural selection theory, according to a University of British Columbia study.Measuring three to 10 centimeters, stickleback fish originated in the ocean but began populating freshwater lakes and streams following the last ice age. Over the past 15,000 years, freshwater sticklebacks have lost their bony lateral plates, or "armor," in these new environments....

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2009-06-18 05:40:00

Scientists have discovered that sticklebacks exhibit an advanced, sophisticated learning technique never before seen in the animal world.  The research reveals that the learning methods of fish may resemble that of humans more than previously believed. The study, conducted by researchers at St. Andrews University and Durham University in Britain, found that nine-spined sticklebacks can observe others to make better decisions. This ability to select the best food patch by comparing how...

2009-06-08 09:25:07

U.S. biologists have found the loss of pelvises and body armor in two species of stickleback fish was caused by different genes. The finding surprised University of Utah researchers, who expected the same genes would control the same evolutionary changes in both related fish. We knew that in many cases of evolution, the same gene has been used over and over again -- even in different species -- to give the same anatomy, Assistant Professor Mike Shapiro said. What we are finding now is that...

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2009-06-04 12:35:00

 New research shows that when two species of stickleback fish evolved and lost their pelvises and body armor, the changes were caused by different genes in each species. That surprised researchers, who expected the same genes would control the same changes in both related fish."We knew that in many cases of evolution, the same gene has been used over and over again "“ even in different species "“ to give the same anatomy," says Mike Shapiro, first author of the new study and...

2009-04-02 16:18:57

Canadian scientists say they have conducted the first experiment that shows the evolution of new species impacts the environment. Scientists at the University of British Columbia created mini-ecosystems in large aquatic tanks using different species of three-spine stickleback fish and saw substantial differences in the ecosystems within 11 weeks. Stickleback fish originated in the ocean, but began populating freshwater lakes and streams following the last ice age. The researchers said that...


Latest Stickleback Reference Libraries

45_93ab9a2f354cd32a7017c45a5ed935b6
2008-05-06 14:47:35

The Nine-spined Stickleback (Pungitius pungitius), is a species of fish in the Gasterosteidae family. It is found in Belarus, Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greenland, Ireland, Japan, South Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Republic of, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

39_b28590aeccf7d5e65ad920a431957a2b
2007-06-24 20:15:53

The Three-Spined Stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, is a fish native to much of northern Europe, northern Asia and North America. It has been introduced into parts of southern and central Europe. Three subspecies that are currently recognized by the IUCN are Gasterosteus aculeatus aculeatus, which is found in most of the species range, and is the subspecies most strictly termed the Three-Spined Stickleback; its common name in England is the Tiddler, although "tittlebat" is also sometimes...

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Word of the Day
virgule
  • A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
  • A little rod; a twig.
This word comes from the Late Latin 'virgula,' accentual mark, a diminutive of 'virga,' rod.
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