Quantcast

Latest Stone Age Europe Stories

America's Short-Lived Clovis People Genetically Mapped For First Time
2014-02-13 07:42:26

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Clovis people lived in America around 13,000 years ago. They hunted mammoth, mastodons and giant bison with big spears. Though they were not the first humans in America, they did represent the first humans with a wide expansion on the North American continent. That is, until the culture mysteriously disappeared only a few hundred years after it emerged. Who the Clovis people were, and what present day humans they are related to...

2014-01-20 10:38:02

The role of the hydrological cycle during abrupt temperature changes is of prime importance for the actual impact of climate change on the continents. In a new study published in Nature Geoscience online (January 19, 2014) scientists from the University of Potsdam, Germany and the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences show that during the abrupt cooling at the onset of the so-called Younger Dryas period 12680 years ago changes in the water cycle were the main drivers of widespread...

Tree Rings Of Prehistoric Wooden Wells Preserved Human History
2012-12-20 11:10:16

Public Library of Science First farming communities in Europe were skilled carpenters, made water wells out of wood Prehistoric farming communities in Europe constructed water wells out of oak timbers, revealing that these first farmers were skilled carpenters long before metal was discovered or used for tools. The research published December 19 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Willy Tegel and colleagues from the University of Freiburg, Germany, contradicts the common belief that...

2010-04-12 11:25:00

Study suggests that Ice Age climate change did not pose significant challenges to first Americans Paleoindian groups* occupied North America throughout the Younger Dryas interval, which saw a rapid return to glacial conditions approximately 11,000 years ago. Until now, it has been assumed that cooling temperatures and their impact on communities posed significant adaptive challenges to those groups. David Meltzer from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas, USA, and Vance Holliday from...

ccebce8cc1da7fa98a6008c2a676a62a1
2010-03-26 13:50:00

This question isn't new, but for years anthropologists, archaeologists and historians of art understood these artistic manifestations as purely aesthetic and decorative motives. Eduardo Palacio-P©rez, researcher at the University of Cantabria (UC), now reveals the origins of a theory that remains nowadays/lasts into our days. "This theory is does not originate with the prehistorians, in other words, those who started to develop the idea that the art of primitive peoples was linked...

c0f5e99d1d8b9b022f4fb2c4e93177af
2009-12-08 11:25:00

An international team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Hawaii at Manoa have found no evidence supporting an extraterrestrial impact event at the onset of the Younger Dryas ~13000 years ago. The Younger Dryas is an abrupt cooling event in Earth's history. It coincided with the extinction of many large mammals including the woolly mammoth, the saber toothed jaguar and many sloths. This cooling period is generally considered to be the result of the complex global climate...

561272a6b188a645d5d63a51582dca671
2009-11-30 10:42:06

In the film, "ËœThe Day After Tomorrow' the world enters the icy grip of a new glacial period within the space of just a few weeks. Now new research shows that this scenario may not be so far from the truth after all. William Patterson, from the University of Saskatchewan in Canada, and his colleagues have shown that switching off the North Atlantic circulation can force the Northern hemisphere into a mini "Ëœice age' in a matter of months. Previous work has indicated that...

a381267bc8f93462edb9163ab5e3090a
2009-09-02 14:53:50

Scientists identify 'tipping points' at which sudden shifts to new conditions occur What do abrupt changes in ocean circulation and Earth's climate, shifts in wildlife populations and ecosystems, the global finance market and its system-wide crashes, and asthma attacks and epileptic seizures have in common? According to a paper published this week in the journal Nature, all share generic early-warning signals that indicate a critical threshold of change dead ahead. In the paper, Martin...

73c3f3b1df18eee9ea0e9c2d0863b78f1
2009-06-24 16:10:00

Archaeologists at the University of Tuebingen in Germany say a bird-bone flute discovered in a German cave was created 35,000 years ago, making it the oldest handmade musical instrument ever discovered. The find provides the latest evidence that early modern humans had established a creative and sophisticated culture in Europe. The researchers, led by University of Tuebingen archaeologist Nicholas Conard, constructed the flute from 12 pieces of griffon vulture bone discovered in a small plot...

d95bef73c50e34507d1a2674925ae0b11
2009-05-14 07:45:00

German anthropologists believe they may have found the oldest man-made representation of a human figure in the form of a grotesquely exaggerated sculpture of a female body.The roughly 3-inch tall figurine carved of mammoth ivory portrays a woman with disproportionately large breasts, prominent buttocks and very pronounced genitals.  The artifact, which has been dubbed the Venus of Hohle Fels, was discovered in an ongoing excavation in southwestern Germany.  Based on the results of...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
Related