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Latest Stone Age Stories

Hunter Gatherers Had Pigs
2013-08-27 13:49:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Hunter-gatherers living in Europe around 4600 BC may have had domesticated pigs thanks to incoming Neolithic farmers, according to a new report in the journal Nature Communications. Authors of the report point to evidence of interactions and an exchange of animals between established hunter-gatherer communities and proliferating farming communities around 6,600 years ago. The relationships eventually led to the hunter-gatherers...

Neanderthal Tools Cultural Differences
2013-08-19 16:17:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new analysis from an archeologist at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom has revealed distinct cultural differences between two groups of Neanderthals based on the divergent design of stone tools between 115,000 and 35,000 years ago. According to a study by researcher Karen Ruebens, the differences point to a more complex Neanderthal culture than what was previously suspected. "In Germany and France there appears to...

Petroglyphs In Nevada Are The Oldest In North America
2013-08-14 04:56:24

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Petroglyphs cut into boulders in at the Winnemucca Lake site in western Nevada have been identified as the oldest known rock engravings in North America, researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder (CU-Boulder) report in a new study. High-tech analysis conducted by CU-Boulder adjunct curator of anthropology Larry Benson and his colleagues has revealed that the petroglyphs, which are cut into several boulders at a location...

Archaeologists Discover World's Oldest Calendar In Scotland
2013-07-15 13:02:07

[ Watch the Video: The Beginning Of Time? ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Archaeology experts say they have made a remarkable discover of what could potentially be the world's oldest "calendar." The ancient calendar dates back to around 8,000 BC, predating the first formal time-measuring devices known to man by nearly 5,000 years. The scientists wrote in the journal Internet Archaeology that they believe that understanding when time began to get logged is...

Climate Change Led To Modern Humans In Stone Age
2013-06-18 19:37:44

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online New evidence suggests that modern humans emerged as the need to find refuge from sudden changes in climate grew. An international team of researchers found that technological innovation and the emergence of culture and modern behavior took place abruptly. They were able to link these pulses of innovation to the climate that prevailed in sub-Saharan Africa during the Stone Age. For the past million years, the global climate...

New Excavations Indicate Use Of Fertilizers During The Scandinavian Stone Age
2013-04-26 12:20:27

University of Gothenburg Researchers from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have spent many years studying the remains of a Stone Age community in Karleby outside the town of Falköping, Sweden. The researchers have for example tried to identify parts of the inhabitants' diet. Right now they are looking for evidence that fertilizers were used already during the Scandinavian Stone Age, and the results of their first analyses may be exactly what they are looking for. Using...

Ötzi Iceman Had Bad Teeth
2013-04-10 10:23:28

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the University of Zurich's Centre for Evolutionary Medicine reveals that the Neolithic Ötzi iceman mummy had an astounding number of oral diseases and dentition problems that are still widespread today. Ötzi, also known as Ötzi the Iceman and the Man from Hauslabjoch, is a well-preserved mummy from approximately 3,300 BCE that was found in the Austrian-Italian Alps in 1991....

Farming Arrived In Stone Age Europe Via Near East Migrants
2013-02-12 12:25:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The seeds for the rise of Western civilization were planted when humans living in Europe began to adopt farming, a more efficient and reliable way to supply food, as opposed to hunting and gathering. A recent report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), found farming technology was brought to the region by people who moved there from the Near East. "One of the big questions in European archaeology...

New Dating Methods Put Neanderthal Extinction Much Earlier Than Previously Thought
2013-02-05 06:41:24

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Popular theories have placed the Neanderthal extinction at about 35,000 years ago, based on dating of the earliest bone fossils found at a Neanderthal site in southern Iberia. However, researchers from Australia and Europe are now refuting that evidence after taking another careful look at the bones and implementing an improved method to filter out contamination. Based on the new study, the Neanderthal may have actually died out much...

New Hints Into Human Ancestry Could Lead To Rethink The 'Out Of Africa' Theory
2012-12-14 12:04:20

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Research and excavations by a Canadian researcher from sites in southern Tanzania could lead to a rethinking of the ℠Out of Africa´ narrative that describes the human diaspora around the globe, according to a new report in the journal Quaternary International. Led by Pamela Willoughby, the Iringa Region Archaeological Project has uncovered artifacts that suggest a constant human occupation between today and at least...


Latest Stone Age Reference Libraries

Homo sapiens idaltu
2013-09-24 12:20:45

Homo sapiens idaltu is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens that lived nearly 160,000 years ago during the Pleistocene in Africa. “Idaltu” comes from the Saho-Afar word meaning “elder” or “first born”. The fossilized remains of H. s. idaltu were uncovered at Herto Bouri near the Middle Awash site of Ethiopia’s Afar Triangle in the year 1997 by Tim White, but were first revealed in 2003. Herto Bouri is a portion of Ethiopia under volcanic layers. By using radioisotope dating,...

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Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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