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Latest Stone Age Stories

New Hints Into Human Ancestry Could Lead To Rethink The 'Out Of Africa' Theory
2012-12-14 12:04:20

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Research and excavations by a Canadian researcher from sites in southern Tanzania could lead to a rethinking of the ℠Out of Africa´ narrative that describes the human diaspora around the globe, according to a new report in the journal Quaternary International. Led by Pamela Willoughby, the Iringa Region Archaeological Project has uncovered artifacts that suggest a constant human occupation between today and at least...

Early African Homo Sapiens Were First Technologically Advanced People
2012-12-06 12:56:14

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Africa, and especially South Africa, is one-step closer to being confirmed as the primary center for the early development of human behavior. Scientists have searched for the origin of modern human behavior and technological advancement among our early African ancestors for a long time. Wits University archaeologist Christopher Henshilwood, along with a team of international researchers, has published the first detailed summary...

2012-11-29 12:40:51

The origin and dispersal of modern humans and modern human behavior are key interests in Paleolithic archaeology and anthropology. Engraved objects are usually seen as a hallmark of cognition and symbolism, which are viewed as important features of modern human behavior. In recent years, engraved ochre, bones and ostrich eggs unearthed from various Paleolithic sites in Africa, the Near East and Europe have attracted the attention of many scholars. However, such items are rarely...

Ancient Tools Provide Clues To The Past
2012-11-07 21:35:27

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A discovery on the south coast of South Africa is leading to implications that modern humans evolved in this location. Scientists have found evidence for an advanced Stone Age technology that dates back 71,000 years at Pinnacle Point near Mossel Bay. The technology allows projectiles to be thrown at a greater distance and killing power. Considering the technology, along with other findings of advanced technologies and evidence...

Baffin Island Provides Clues To Glacier Melt
2012-09-14 09:16:08

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research, led by the University at Buffalo, is examining an important mystery surrounding climate change: How quickly do glaciers melt and grow in response to shifts in temperature. According to the study, published in Science, glaciers on Canada's Baffin Island expanded rapidly during a brief cold snap about 8,200 years ago. This discovery adds to a growing body of evidence that shows ice sheets reacted rapidly in the past to...

Later Stone Age Emerged Earlier In South Africa
2012-07-31 06:01:49

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Two recent articles in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences show that the Later Stone Age (LSA) and Modern Culture both emerged much earlier than was previously thought. A team of international scientists from South Africa, France, Italy, Norway, the USA and Britain dated and directly analyzed organic objects found in the archaeological layers at Border Cave, South Africa in the Lebombo Mountains near the border of...

Digging For The Oldest Genetic Material In Spain
2012-07-02 12:02:22

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) have recovered and sequenced the oldest genetic material from two individuals living in Mesolithic Spain, over 7,000 years ago. This groundbreaking work of genetics, published in Current Biology, shows that the sequenced genomes are out-of-sync with modern day Iberians. "These hunters-gatherers shared nomadic habits and had a common origin,” said study co-author...

Oldest Neolithic Bow Discovered In Europe At La Draga Neolithic Site In Banyoles
2012-06-29 11:39:45

Archaeological research carried out at the Neolithic site of La Draga, near the lake of Banyoles, has yielded the discovery of an item which is unique in the western Mediterranean and Europe. The item is a bow which appeared in a context dating from the period between 5400-5200 BCE, corresponding to the earliest period of settlement. It is a unique item given that it is the first bow to be found in tact at the site. According to its date, it can be considered chronologically the most ancient...

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2012-05-29 21:59:26

Michael Harper for RedOrbit.com The age-old struggle between classes may be even older than we thought, according to a new study carried out by archaeologists from the Universities of Bristol, Cardiff and Oxford. According to their research, hereditary inequality may have begun as early as 7,000 years ago in the Neolithic era. The archeologists found evidence showing farmers who were buried with tools were also buried in better land than those farmers without. The research was...

Study Supports Theory That Migration Brought Agriculture To Europe
2012-04-27 07:44:30

A new analysis of ancient DNA belonging to a quartet of Stone Age humans has shed new light on how agriculture may have spread from the Middle East into Europe, the Associated Press (AP) and AFP reported on Thursday. The study, which was completed by researchers at a trio of Swedish and Danish universities and published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, looked at the genetic material from 5,000 year old bones belonging to one farmer and three hunter gatherers, according to those...


Latest Stone Age Reference Libraries

Homo sapiens idaltu
2013-09-24 12:20:45

Homo sapiens idaltu is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens that lived nearly 160,000 years ago during the Pleistocene in Africa. “Idaltu” comes from the Saho-Afar word meaning “elder” or “first born”. The fossilized remains of H. s. idaltu were uncovered at Herto Bouri near the Middle Awash site of Ethiopia’s Afar Triangle in the year 1997 by Tim White, but were first revealed in 2003. Herto Bouri is a portion of Ethiopia under volcanic layers. By using radioisotope dating,...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.