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7ab72ea7d055c9b24c4ab1b3af7a0f4d1
2011-02-25 06:15:00

The oldest human remains ever discovered in sub-Arctic North America have been unearthed in a newly excavated archaeological site in Alaska, scientists said on Thursday. The skeletal remains appear to be those of a 3-year-old child buried some 11,500 years ago, and could provide rare insight into the burial practices of Ice Age peoples and the lives of early settlers who crossed from Asia to the New World, the scientists said. The remains were discovered in an ancient fire pit within an...

7ab6674f510ea79dc81334e4d8771c49
2011-02-03 11:25:26

One of the most significant socioeconomic changes in the history of humanity took place around 10,000 years ago, when the Near East went from an economy based on hunting and gathering (Mesolithic) to another kind on agriculture (Neolithic). Farmers rapidly entered the Balkan Peninsula and then advanced gradually throughout the rest of Europe. Various theories have been proposed over recent years to explain this process, and now physicists from the University of Girona (UdG) have for the first...

2011-02-02 19:08:27

Anthropologists at the University of Toronto and the University of Cambridge have discovered the oldest cemetery in the Middle East at a site in northern Jordan.  The cemetery includes graves containing human remains buried alongside those of a red fox, suggesting that the animal was possibly kept as a pet by humans long before dogs ever were. The 16,500-year-old site at 'Uyun al-Hammam was discovered in 2000 by an expedition led by University of Toronto professor Edward (Ted) Banning...

2010-12-03 13:33:32

Agricultural "“ or Neolithic "“ economics replaced the Mesolithic social model of hunter-gathering in the Near East about 10,000 years ago. One of the most important socioeconomic changes in human history, this socioeconomic shift, known as the Neolithic transition, spread gradually across Europe until it slowed down when more northern latitudes were reached. Research published today, Friday, 3 December 2010, in New Journal of Physics (co-owned by the Institute of Physics and the...

2010-11-04 13:43:44

Stone Age humans were only able to develop relatively advanced tools after their brains evolved a greater capacity for complex thought Stone Age humans were only able to develop relatively advanced tools after their brains evolved a greater capacity for complex thought, according to a new study that investigates why it took early humans almost two million years to move from razor-sharp stones to a hand-held stone axe. Researchers used computer modelling and tiny sensors embedded in...

25561a3f339862183c8b062c6f9289551
2010-11-04 10:11:20

Was it the evolution of the hand, or of the brain, that enabled prehistoric toolmakers to make the leap from simple flakes of rock to a sophisticated hand axe? A new study finds that the ability to plan complex tasks was key. The research, published today in the Public Library of Science journal PLoS ONE, is the first to use a cyber data glove to precisely measure the hand movements of stone tool making, and compare the results to brain activation. "Making a hand axe appears to require...

22fa60f7f7b507f808544f9faa1b9bf31
2010-10-29 07:04:00

Researchers have discovered the oldest evidence to date that prehistoric humans in southern Africa had mastered a complex, delicate process to sharpen stones into spears and knives at least 75,000 years ago, more than 50,000 years earlier than previously believed, according to a study published Thursday. The technique, known as pressure flaking, took place at Blombos Cave in modern day South Africa during the Middle Stone Age by anatomically modern humans, and involved the heating of silcrete...

87499cf8c86ba600335b8cd84286e2cb1
2010-10-21 06:15:00

Archaeologists have discovered a "fantastically preserved", 5,100-year-old door in Zurich, Switzerland. The poplar wood door, which researchers believe was made in 3,063 BC, is "solid and elegant", and may be one of the oldest ever found in Europe, said chief archaeologist Niels Bleicher on Wednesday. It had well-preserved hinges and was "remarkable because of the way the planks were held together," said Bleicher, who used tree rings to determine the age of the door. It was likely built...

0a124c37da92474fd3bec7119b4dd376
2010-10-12 23:05:00

Geographers at Leicester use forensic techniques to investigate untapped resourceScientists at the University of Leicester are using an unusual resource to investigate ancient climates"“ prehistoric animal urine.The animal in question is the rock hyrax, a common species in countries such as Namibia and Botswana. They look like large guinea pigs but are actually related to the elephant. Hyraxes use specific locations as communal toilets, some of which have been used by generations of...

9485eb2096f9dfaee77bd6d96ee2f6e31
2010-09-30 07:57:57

New research challenges the controversial theory that an ancient comet impact devastated the Clovis people, one of the earliest known cultures to inhabit North America. Writing in the October issue of Current Anthropology, archaeologists Vance Holliday (University of Arizona) and David Meltzer (Southern Methodist University) argue that there is nothing in the archaeological record to suggest an abrupt collapse of Clovis populations. "Whether or not the proposed extraterrestrial impact...


Latest Stone Age Reference Libraries

Homo sapiens idaltu
2013-09-24 12:20:45

Homo sapiens idaltu is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens that lived nearly 160,000 years ago during the Pleistocene in Africa. “Idaltu” comes from the Saho-Afar word meaning “elder” or “first born”. The fossilized remains of H. s. idaltu were uncovered at Herto Bouri near the Middle Awash site of Ethiopia’s Afar Triangle in the year 1997 by Tim White, but were first revealed in 2003. Herto Bouri is a portion of Ethiopia under volcanic layers. By using radioisotope dating,...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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